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Unit History: RAF Gaydon

RAF Gaydon
RAF Gaydon is a former Royal Air Force station in Warwickshire in the UK.
During World War II an RAF station was built near the village. This was a standard three-runway airfield similar to a number of other airfields nearby and was used mainly for training bomber crews, using Wellington Bombers or their training variants. Immediately after the war bomber training ceased and Gaydon became a training establishment for glider pilots and gliding instructors.
The airfield was then placed under care and maintenance until the early 1950s when it was designated as a future V-bomber training base. The airfield was therefore completely remodelled with one single massively long and wide runway. V bombers were then cutting edge technology and the teaching of pilots who may have trained on 200mph Wellingtons to fly the new much larger heavier and faster, nuclear capable, jet bomber was viewed with much apprehension, although in the event many of the more alarmist views proved unfounded.
On 1 January 1955 the first 138 Squadron operating Vickers Valiants reformed at Gaydon as the first V-bomber squadron and the airfield then settled down as the training unit for Valiant and later Victor squadrons. The airfield was used for operational bomber training until September 1965 at which point it became home to No 2 Air Navigation School, responsible for the initial training of all RAF Navigators.
The contrast between the V Bombers and the Vickers Varsity training aircraft cannot have been more pronounced. The Varsity was a direct descendant of the wartime Wellington with a very similar performance. When it first flew in 1949 it was reasonably advanced but by the mid sixties was definitely long in the tooth and had earned the nickname "flying pig" from the crews. Although older aircrew were quite happy to accept the slow pace of life younger ones considered flying elderly piston engined aircraft,at less than 200mph,on seemingly endless preset courses, to be less than exciting.
However although the base was ostensibly only a training establishment information released recently reveals that Gaydon was still part of the strategic plan and in the event of war it was one of bases to which Victor bombers would have dispersed ready to carry out nuclear strikes against an enemy.
The Air Navigation School moved to RAF Finningley, Yorkshire in 1970 and after a short period as a maintenance facility Gaydon was reduced to a Care and Maintenance Status until closure.
The station closed in 1974 and the airfield was bought in 1978 by British Leyland.

Memories of RAF Gaydon

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

Station band - RAF Gaydon in 1961

Written by george jurish

Any of the guys in the band '61 - '62 remember me (George Jurish - Corporal) I was in station workshops as a Gen.fitter. I have to admit that now the old memory's got a bit "gash" the only name I can readily recall is the Bandmaster, Flt.Sgt.Les Smith.
If you were there you may recall we had a parade at Wellesbourne when I was half way through "clearing" to be demobbed, (Sept.'62) and I turned out for a final blow. Everyone thought I was mad, but it was a lasr chance to "blow a raspberry" before I left.
If there is anyone out there who remebers me, do get in touch. All the best and as they say in the best of circles "Nil illegitami carborundum" !!!

RAF Gaydon, in 1955

Written by john stevenson

I had the honour belonging to the very first servicing team to work on Valiants carrying out acceptance checks on delivery from Vickers.If my memories serve me right WP206&WP207.

RAF Gaydon, in 1967

Written by Douglas Richards

Nights out inLeamington Spa,Coventry. The Kinks appearing at the NAAFI. Being on duty at Christmas and whilst we took turns going to the pub in Kineton. Being duty electrician metc and hoping nothing went wrong. All the dances etyc. And being the station postman.
Down arrow Up arrow 12 people in our WW2 records
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Down arrow Up arrow 29 people in our Forces Reunited records
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Active From: 1941 - 1974

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