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Unit History: Amphibious Engineer Regiment

Amphibious Engineer Regiment
n May 1962 1 Troop, 50 Field Squadron RE was reformed as 23 Amphibious River Crossing Cadre, equipped with seven French EWK-Gillois amphibious bridges for trials. The trials proved encouraging and the Cadre was expanded into 23 Amphibious Engineer Squadron RE in 1963.
 
However, in June 1962 information came to light that convinced Staff that the German M2 Amphibious Bridging and Ferry Equipment was more suited to British requirements. By 1964 23 Amphibious Engineer Squadron RE was training with M2 rigs borrowed from the Bundeswehr (West German Army).
 
In early 1970 sufficient modified M2B rigs were available for 23 Amphibious Engineer Squadron RE to be divided into three troops each holding eight rigs. In April 1971 28 Amphibious Engineer Regiment was formed with 23 Amphibious Engineers Squadron RE and two new squadrons - 64 and 73 Amphibious Engineer Squadron RE.
 
A Class 60 M2 Ferry built by 23 Amphibious Engineer Squadron crossing the River Waser on Exercise Keystone, West Germany - 1979
A Class 60 M2 Ferry built by 23 Amphibious Engineer Squadron crossing the River Waser on Exercise Keystone, West Germany - 1979
Harrier Support - By the end of 1970 the RAF had two Harrier Squadrons in West Germany, this threw up the requirement from the Royal Engineers to provide engineer support to the RAF Harrier squadrons operating from forward tactical sites. In 1973 10 Field Squadron RE was established at RAF Laarbruch to provide that support, it came under the command of the Chief Engineer BAOR.
 
In 1979 3 Division was deployed to BAOR giving 1 (BR) Corps four divisions, shortly afterwards, in 1981, 2 Division was sent back to the UK.
 
The Combat Engineer Tractor (CET) was brought in service with the field squadron in BAOR in 1978. It was the first such machine since the Second World War to be designed specifically for engineer use. It was capable of performing tasks in close support of mechanised troops. it had a 1.7 cubic metre bucket, was fully amphibious, could carry a rocket-propelled earth anchor and had fittings for towing Giant Viper and laying trackway.
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Active From: 1971 - 1980

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