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Unit History: Royal Fusiliers (London Regiment)

Royal Fusiliers (London Regiment)
The Regiment was first formed in 1685 by George Legge, 1st Baron of Dartmouth in order to support King James II during the Monmouth Rebellion, when James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth (the illegitimate son of Charles II and the King’s nephew) unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow the unpopular King.
 
The Regiment was initially named as the Ordinance Regiment and employed as an elite corps for escorting and protecting artillery guns.  The Regiment was armed with the ‘Fusil’ muskets which was the most modern weapon of the day, instead of matchlock muskets which held the the danger of igniting the open topped barrels of gunpowder carried by the artillery.  The Regiment became the Royal Regiment of Fuzileers and went on to served during the Nine Years War (1688–97), fighting at the Siege of Namur in 1695.
 
In 1751 all British Regiments were awarded a numerical title according to their precedence therefore the Regiment became known as the 7th (Royal Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot.  In 1773 the Regiment deployed to garrison Quebec in order to quell the increasing civil unrest prior to the American War of Independence (1775–1783).  In 1775 9 of the Regiments 10 companies were captured while the remaining one was besieged in Quebec.  In 1776 prisoners of the Royal Fuzileers were successfully exchanged for rebels and with the relief of Quebec the Regiment was able to reform in New York.  The Regiment went on to fight at the Battle of Monmouth Courthouse and besieged and captured the City of Charleston during the Southern Campaign but suffered terrible casualties during the Battle of Cowpens and was unable to recover until it returned to England in 1783.
 
During the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815) the Regiment captured the Danish city of Copenhagen in 1807 and the French island colony of Martinique in 1809, before joining the Duke of Wellington’s famed Fusilier Brigade and fought at the Battles of Talavera (1809), Busaco (1810), Albuera (1811), the siege of Badajos (1811), the siege of Ciudad Rodrigo (1812), Salamanca (1812), Vittoria (1813), Roncesvalles (1813), San Sebastien (1813), Orthes (1814) and Toulouse (1814).  Following the defeat of Napoleon the Regiment was dispatched to America to curb the expansionist ambitions of the United States, which tried to annex Canada during the war of 1812 (1812-1815).  The War was a 32-month military conflict between the United States and the British Empire, resolving many of the remaining issues of the American War of Independence, and the Regiment fought in the unsuccessful attempt to capture of New Orleans.
 
The next 39 years were relatively uneventful for the Regiment until 1854 when it was dispatched to serve in the Crimean War (1853–1856) fighting at the Battle of the Alma and Inkerman as well as during the siege and relief of Sevastopol.
 
In 1881 the Childers Reforms restructured the British army infantry into a network of multi-battalion Regiments each having two regular and two militia battalions.  The Regiment managed to avoid amalgamation but the number of precedence was dropped and became The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment).  The Regiment went on to serve during the Second Boer Wars (1899–1902) and two World Wars.  Due to Government Defence Reviews on the 23rd April 1968 the Regiment was merged with the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers (5th Foot), The Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers (6th Foot) and the Lancashire Fusiliers (20th Foot) to form The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers of the Queens Division.

Royal Fusiliers (London Regiment) during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Royal Fusiliers raised an additional 76 battalions and were awarded 80 Battle Honours and 12 Victoria Crosses (two of which were the first awarded in the war for the Battle of Mons and the last two of the war in North Russia) losing 15,600 men during the course of the war. In 1914 1,600 members of the Stock exchange joined the Regiment to form the Stock Exchange Battalion, 400 of which were killed during the war. Five Battalions of the Regiment (the 38th to the 42nd) served as the Jewish Legion in Palestine and many contributed to the founding of the State of Israel in 1948.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Kinsale, Munster at the outbreak of war as part of the 17th Brigade of the 6th Division then moved to Cambridge.
Sept 1914 Mobilized for war and landed at St. Nazaire, France.
During 1914
The actions on the Aisne heights.
During 1915
The action at Hooge.
14.10.1915 The 17th Brigade transferred to the 24th Division.
During 1916
The German gas attack at Wulverghem, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy Ridge, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Rosieres, The First Battle of the Avre, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre, the passage of the Grand Honelle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Bavai.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Calcutta, India, returned to England landing Jan 1915 and moved to Nuneaton to join the 86th Brigade of the 29th Division.
Mar 1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli at Avonmouth via Alexandria and Lemnos.
25.04.1915 Landed at Gallipoli and were engaged in actions at the Battles for Krithia and the Achi Baba heights on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
08.01.1916 Evacuated to Egypt.
Mar 1916 Moved to France landing at Marseilles where the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Battle of Cambrai.
During 1918
The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Hazebrouck, the defence on Nieppe Forest, The Battle of Bailleul, The Action of Outtersteene Ridge, The capture of Ploegsteert and Hill 63, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Belgium, St. Genois S.E. of Courtrai.

3rd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Lucknow, India, returned to England landing Dec 1914 and moved to Winchester to join the 85th Brigade of the 28th Division.
Jan 1915 Mobilized for war and landed at Havre where the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1915
The Second Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Loos.
Oct 1915 Ordered to Move to Salonika via Egypt, arriving Dec 1915 and engaged in various actions to support Serbian forces against the Bulgaria army including;
During 1916
The occupation of Mazirko, The capture of Barakli Jum'a.
During 1917
The capture of Ferdie and Essex Trenches (near Barakli Jum'a), The capture of Barakli and Kumli.
03-04.07.1918 Moved from Greece to Taranto Italy to support the Italian Resistance.
09.07.1918 Moved back to France to join the 149th Brigade of the 50th Division and were again engaged in actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Beaurevoir Line, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Dourlers north of Avesnes.

4th Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Parkhurst, Isle of Wight as part of the 9th Brigade of the 3rd Division.
13.08.1914 Mobilized for war and landed at Havre the Division was one of the first to arrive and remained on the Western Front for the duration of the war engaged in various actions including;
During 1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of Le Cateau, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battles of La Bassee and The Battle of Messines, First Battle of Ypres.
During 1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The First Attack on Bellewaarde, The Actions of Hooge, The Second Attack on Bellewaarde.
During 1916
The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Cambrai.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, near Bavai.

5th and 6th (Reserve) Battalions
04.08.1914 Stationed at Hounslow and then both moved to Dover.
1917 6th Battalion moved to Carrickfergus, Northern Ireland.

7th (Extra Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Finsbury, London and then moved to Falmouth, Cornwall.
24.07.1916 Mobilized for war and landed at Havre, joined the 190th Brigade of the63rd Division and remained on the Western Front for the remainder of the war engaged in various actions including;
The Battle of the Ancre 1916.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, the Arras Offensive, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of Passchendaele, the Third Battles of Ypres., The action of Welsh Ridge and the Cambrai operations.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Albert, the Second Battles of the Somme, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, the Second Battles of Arras, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, the Final Advance in Picardy.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Belgium, Harveng south of Mons.

8th (Service) Battalion
21.08.1914 Formed at Hounslow as part of the First New Army (K1), moving to Colchester and joining the 26th Brigade of the 12th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Hythe and then Aldershot.
May 1915 Mobilized for war and landed at France and the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
The Battle of Loos.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Cambrai operations,
06.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

9th (Service) Battalion
21.08.1914 Formed at Hounslow as part of the First New Army (K1), moving to Colchester and joining the 26th Brigade of the 12th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Hythe and then Aldershot.
May 1915 Mobilised for war and landed at France and the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
The Battle of Loos.
09.12.1915 The Battalion assisting in rounding-up spies and other uncertain characters in the streets of Bethune.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Cambrai operations.
During 1918
The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of Epehy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, east of Orchies.

10th (Service) Battalion
21.08.1914 Formed in London by the Lord Mayor and the City of London as part of the Second New Army (K2), recruited from members of the Stock Exchanged and known as the ‘Stockbrokers’.
Sept 1914 joined the 54th Brigade of the 18th Division.
Oct 1914 Transferred to the Army Troops of the 18th Division.
Mar 1915 Moved to the 111th Brigade of the 37th Division and moved to Salisbury Plain.
03.07.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of the Ancre, The Battle of the Albert, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, south of Le Quesnoy.

11th (Service) Battalion
06.09.1914 Formed Hounslow as part of the Second New Army (K2), and joined the 54th Brigade of the 18th Division and then moved to Colchester.
May 1915 Moved to Salisbury Plain.
July 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The capture of Regina Trench, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
Operations on the Ancre, The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, First Battle of Passchendaele, and The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of the Avre, The actions of Villers-Brettoneux, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, captured the Tara and Usna hills, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, near Le Cateau.

12th (Service) Battalion
13.09.1914 Formed Hounslow as part of the Third New Army (K3), and joined the 73rd Brigade of the 24th Division and then moved to South Downs.
Nov 1914 – June 1915 Moved to Shoreham then Brighton and Pirbright.
01.09.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France, transferred to the 17th Brigade of the same Division which was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1915
The Battle of Loos.
During 1916
The German gas attack at Wulverghem, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy Ridge, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
13.03.1918 Disbanded in France and remaining personnel transferred to the 1st 10th and 11th Battalions.

13th (Service) Battalion
13.09.1914 Formed at Hounslow as part of the Third New Army (K3), and joined the Army Troops attached to the 24th Division and then moved to South Downs.
Dec 1914 Moved to Worthing, West Sussex.
Mar 1915 transferred to the 111st Brigade of the 37th Division and moved to Ludgershall.
30.07.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in Boulogne and the Division was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele.
04.02.1918 Transferred to the 112th Brigade of the 37th Division and continued to engage in action on the Western Front including;
During 1918
The Battle of the Ancre, The Battle of the Albert, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
13.03.1918 Disbanded in France and remaining personnel transferred to the 1st 10th and 11th Battalions.

14th and 15th (Reserve) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed at Dover as a service battalion for the Four New Army (K4), and joined the 95th Brigade of the original 32nd Division.
10.04.1914 Became the 2nd Reserve Battalion of the 7th Reserve Brigade.
May 1915 Moved to Purfleet to Shoreham and then Dover.
01.09.1916 became the 31st and 32nd Training Reserve Battalions of the 7th Reserve Brigade.

16th (Reserve) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed at Falmouth as a service battalion for the Four New Army (K4), and joined the 103rd Brigade of the original 34th Division.
10.04.1914 Became the 2nd Reserve Battalion.
May 1915 Moved to Purfleet to Shoreham as part of the 5th Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 22nd Training Reserve Battalions absorbing the 9th Royal West Kent Battalion.

17th (Service) Battalion (Empire)
31.08.1914 Formed in London by the British Empire Committee then moved to Warlingham, Surrey and then to Clipstone Camp, Nottinghamshire and joined the 99th Brigade of the 33rd Division.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Tidworth, Wiltshire.
17.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne, the 99th Brigade transferred to the 2nd Division and then transferred to the 5th Brigade of the same Division which was engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
06.02.1918 transferred to the 6th Brigade of the 2nd Division and continued to engage in actions on the Western Front including;
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Preux-au-Sart N.E. of Le Quesnoy.

18th (Service) Battalion (1st Public Schools) and the 19th and 21st (Service) Battalions (2nd & 4th Public Schools)
11.09.1914 Formed in Epsom by the Public Schools and University Mens’ Force then the 18th and 19th moved to Clipstone Camp, Nottinghamshire and the 21st moved to Ashstead and joined the 98th Brigade of the 33rd Division.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Tidworth, Wiltshire.
Nov 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France. The 18th and 19th Battalions transferred to the 19th Brigade while the 21st remained in the 98th Brigade, all remained in the 33rd Division and were engaged in various actions on the Western front.
26.06.1916 All battalions transferred to G.H.Q. Troops
24.04.1916 All disbanded in France and many of the men were commissioned.

20th (Service) Battalion (3rd Public Schools)
11.09.1914 Formed in Epsom by the Public Schools and University Mens’ Force then moved to Leatherhead joined the 98th Brigade of the 33rd Division.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Tidworth, Wiltshire.
Nov 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and then transferred to the 19th Brigade of the 33rd Division and were engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The attacks on High Wood, The capture of Boritska and Dewdrop Trenches.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The actions on the Hindenburg Line, Operations on the Flanders coast, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood.
16.02.1918 All disbanded in France and many of the men were commissioned.

22nd (Service) Battalion (Kensington)
11.09.1914 Formed at White City by the Mayor and the Borough of Kensington then moved to Horsham and then on to Clipstone Camp, Nottinghamshire to joined the 98th Brigade of the 33rd Division.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Tidworth, Wiltshire.
Nov 1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and then transferred to the 99th Brigade of the 2nd Division and were engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
26.02.1918 Disbanded in France at Metz-en-Couture.

24th (Service) Battalion (2nd Sportsman’s)
11.09.1914 Formed at London by the E. Cunliffe-Owen then moved to Horsham and then on to Clipstone Camp, Nottinghamshire to joined the 99th Brigade of the 33rd Division.
01.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Tidworth, Wiltshire.
Nov 1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and then transferred to the 99th Brigade and then the 5th Brigade of the 2nd Division and were engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, north of Le Quesnoy.

25th (Service) Battalion (Frontiersmen)
12.02.1915 Formed in London by the Legion of Frontiersmen.
10.04.1915 Embarked for East Africa at Plymouth, arriving in Mombasa 04.05.1915. The Battalion was part of a Force in Africa which defended British Colonies from German Colonial raids mostly focused in the areas around Lake Tanganyika, British East African and German East African territory.
End of 1917 Left East Africa for England.
29.06.1918 Disbanded in England.

26th (Service) Battalion (Bankers)
17.07.1915 Formed of Bank Clerks and Accountants in London by the Lord Mayor and the City of London then moved to Marlow.
Nov 1915 Moved to Aldershot and joined the 124th Brigade of the 41st Division.
04.05.1916 Embarked for France and the Division was engaged in various action on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
During 1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road, Operations on the Flanders coast.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance and assumed control of a front line sector behind the River Piave.
Mar 1918 Returned to France and were once again engaged in actions on the Western Front including;
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Arras, The Battles of the Lys, The Advance in Flanders, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Ooteghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Belgium, north of Renaix.

27th (Reserve) Battalion
Aug1915 Formed at Horsham from the Depot Companies of the 17th, 22nd and 32nd Battalions to become a local Reserve Battalion.
Nov 1915 Moved to Oxford and joined the 24th Reserve Brigade.
April 1916 Moved to Edinburgh and then became the 103rd Training Reserve Battalion in the 24th Reserve Brigade.

28th and 29th (Reserve) Battalion
Aug1915 The 28th formed at Epsom from the Depot Companies of the 18th and 19th Battalions and the 29th was formed from the Depot Companies of the 20th and 21st Battalions to become a local Reserve Battalion.
Nov 1915 Moved to Oxford and then to Edinburgh.
01.09.1916 Became the 104th and 105th Training Reserve Battalion in the 24th Reserve Brigade.

30th and 31st (Reserve) Battalion
Aug1915 The 30th formed at Romford from the Depot Companies of the 23rd and 24th Battalions to become a local Reserve Battalion.
Sept 1915 The 31st formed at Colchester from the Depot Companies of the 10th and 26th Battalions to become a local Reserve Battalion.
Nov 1915 Moved to Leamington and joined the 24th Reserve Brigade.
Jan 1916 The 30th moved to Oxford, the 31st moved to Abingdon and then both on to Edinburgh.
01.09.1916 Became the 106th and 107th Training Reserve Battalion in the 24th Reserve Brigade.

32nd (Service) Battalion (East Ham)
18.10.1915 Formed in East Ham by the Mayor and the Borough.
Dec 1915 Transferred to the 124th Brigade of the 41st Division and moved to Aldershot.
05.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division was engaged in various action on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
During 1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road, Operations on the Flanders coast.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance and assumed control of a front line sector behind the River Piave.
Mar 1918 Returned to France and were then disbanded in France on the 18.03.1918.

33rd (Labour) Battalion
05.03.1916 Formed at Seaford.
June 1916 Mobilised and moved to France as part of the Army Troops.
April 1917 Became the 99th and 100th Labour Companies of the Labour Corps.

34th and 35th (Labour) Battalion
09.04.1916 and May 1916 Formed at Falmer.
June 1916 Mobilised and moved to France.
April 1917 Became the 101st 102nd 103rd and 104th Labour Companies of the Labour Corps.

36th (Labour) Battalion
May 1916 Formed at Falmer.
June 1916 Mobilised and moved to France.
April 1917 Became the 105th and 106th Labour Companies of the Labour Corps.

37th (Labour) Battalion
06.06.1916 Formed at Falmer.
July 1916 Mobilised and moved to France as part of the Army Troops.
April 1917 Became the 107th and 108th Labour Companies of the Labour Corps.

38th (Service) Battalion
20.01.1918 Formed from Jewish Volunteers at Plymouth.
05.02.1918 Embarked for Cherbourg from Southampton then travelled across France to Taranto, Italy.
01.03.1918 Moved to Alexandria
11.06.1918 Transferred to the 31st Brigade of the 10th Division.
Sept 1918 Transferred to the Australian and New Zealand Mounted Division in Chaytor’s Force, engaged in various actions against the Ottoman Empire probably involved in the Battles of Megiddo and remained in Palestine until the end of the war.

39th and 40th (Service) Battalions
Jan 1918 Formed from Jewish Volunteers at Plymouth.
April 1918 The 39th embarked for Egypt and the 40th in Aug 1918 where it remained.
Sept 1918 Transferred to the 38th Battalion in Chaytor’s Force, engaged in various actions against the Ottoman Empire probably involved in the Battles of Megiddo and remained in Palestine until the end of the war.

41st and 42nd (Reserve) Battalions
Formed in Plymouth to supply drafts for the 38th 39th and 40th Battalions.

43rd and 44th (Garrison) Battalions
May and Sept 1918 Formed in France for duty at the five Army Headquarters from Garrison Guard Companies.

45th and 46th (Garrison) Battalions
April 1919 Formed in London and went to North Russia but disbanded in Dec.

51st (Graduated) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed in Ipswich from the 259th Graduated Battalion (previously the 106th Training Reserve Battalion and before that the 30th Battalion). Became part of the 215th Brigade of the 72nd Division.
Mar 1918 Transferred to the 204th Brigade of the 68th Division and moved to Newmarket.

52nd (Graduated) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed in Ipswich from the 265th Graduated Battalion (previously the 107th Training Reserve Battalion and before that the 31th Battalion). Became part of the 217th Brigade of the 72nd Division.
Mar 1918 Transferred to the 204th Brigade of the 68th Division and moved to Newmarket.

53rd (Young Soldier) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed in Catterick from the 104th Young Soldier Battalion of the Training Reserve (previously the 28th Battalion). Transferred to the 2nd Reserve Brigade.
Oct 1918 Moved to Clipstone.

Royal Fusiliers (London Regiment) during WW2

WW2 Battalions of Royal Fusiliers (City of London) Regiment

1st Battalion
The Battalion were active in the Middle Eastern and African campaign and in the Italian campaign.
1943: the Battalion and 2nd Battalion almost fought alongside each other at the Battle of Monte Cassino

2nd Battalion
1940: the Battalion were engaged throughout the withdrawal through Belgium and France where the remnants were evacuated from Dunkirk
1943: the Battalion and 1st Battalion almost fought alongside each other at the Battle of Monte Cassino

7th Battalion (Royal London Regiment of Militia)

8th (1st City of London) Battalion
The Battalion were active in the Middle Eastern and African campaign and in the Italian campaign

9th (2nd City of London) Battalion
The Battalion were active in the Middle Eastern and African campaign and in the Italian campaign
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1

Active From: 1685 - 1968

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