Center Col: Unset
Col Margin: Unset
Col Status: Unset
Mouse over button or menu: Unset
Home Btn Pos X (Left), Y (bottom): Unset
Mouse X, Y: Unset

Recommend this page to a friend:




On a mobile device? Try our mobile site

Unit History: Royal Corps of Transport

Royal Corps of Transport
As a result of the accepted recommendations of the McLeod Committee, a Royal Warrant dated 26 March 1965 changed the title of the Royal Army Service Corps to Royal Corps of Transport to be effective from 15 July 1965.
 
THE McLEOD REORGANIZATION
 
During the period 1961 to 1963 there were discussions within the then War Office on the need to reorganize the Logistic Services. The proposition put forward was in general terms that there should be:-
 
One Corps for supplying the Army.
One Corps for moving the Army.
One Corps for repairing the vehicles and equipment of the Army
 
Brigadier WJ Potter (later Major General Sir John Potter KBE CB) was Director of Administrative Planning at the War Office, and with the then Quarter Master General, General Sir Gerald Lathbury developed the theme for the reorganization on the above lines. The QMG presented a paper to the Army Council (now Army Board) on the subject, and after a number of discussions by the Council, General Sir Roderick McLeod GBE KCB DL then GOG in C Eastern Command was appointed as Head of the Committee to examine the proposals. The first meeting of General McLeod’s Committee took place on 7 May 1963 and the Committee in a remarkably short time presented to the Army Council their proposals for the changes that would in fact produce an organization on the basis of the concept given above.
 
These included the formation of a Transport Corps for the Army based on the RASC.
 
In addition, the Royal Engineers would hand over to the new Transport Corps, its transportation functions including Ports, Inland Water and Railways, (other than its civil engineering aspects and mechanical repair), and the Movement Control Service.
 
From 15 July 1965, the RASC ceased to exist except in history, and the RCT was formed. Its role is to provide transport and movement support to the Army in both peace and war. Transport support includes road, rail and maritime transport together with port operating and air despatch duties. Movements support comprises planning, policy, co-ordination and control of all non-tactical personnel and freight movement, by land, sea and air.
 
 
 
RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE RCT
 
The main responsibilities of the new Corps are:-
 
The operation of all forms of road, rail and inland water transport in support of the Army (other than transport organic to the unit). All aspects relating to movement affecting the Army by land, sea and air in peace and war, other than tactical movement.
All transport matters in connection with replenishment in the field including the distribution of all combat supplies forward of replenishment parks.
The operation of harbour and coastal craft and logistic seagoing ships of the Army Department Fleet.
The operation of military ports in the United Kingdom and overseas.
The management, tasking and control of the secure military lines of communication.
The operation of supply by air.
The formulation of doctrine and policy for the administration and operation of B Vehicle management and the control and use of non-operational road transport in the Army.
The management of the system of B vehicle and certain A vehicle driver training in the Army.
The co-ordination of road safety measures in the Army. The Royal Corps of Transport (RCT) was a British Army corps  formed in 1965 from the transport (land, water and air) and movement control elements of the Royal Army Service Corps (RASC) and the Royal Engineers (RE).
 
The depot was Buller Barracks in Aldershot. In 1993 the Royal Logistic Corps (RLC) was formed by the amalgamation of The Royal Army Service Corps, Royal Army Ordnance Corps, Royal Pioneer Corps, Army Catering Corps, and Postal and Courier elements of the RE,History and scope of the Regiment
 
Royal Waggoners
1794-1795
 
Royal Waggon Corps
1799-1802
 
Royal Waggon Train
1802-1833
 
Land Transport Corps
1855- 1856
 
Military Train
1856- 1869
 
Army Service Corps
1869- 1881
 
Control Department and Army Service Corps
1869- 1875
 
Commissariat and Transport Department and Army Service Corps
1875 – 1880
 
Commissariat and Transport Staff and Army Service Corps
1880 - 1881
 
Commissariat and Transport Corps
1881- 1888
 
Army Service Corps
1888- 1918
 
Royal Engineers (transportation)
1916- 1965
 
Royal Army Service Corps
1918- 1965
 
Royal Corps of Transport
1965- 1993
 
 
The motto on the badge of the regiment is HONI SOIT QUI MAL Y PENSE which is French in origin and means Shame on him who thinks this evil. It is Incorporated into the badges of the regiment using the emblem of the most noble order of the garter, an ancient order of knighthood of which the Queen is sovereign and dates back to Edward III, it was reputedly to be a revival of the Round Table

Memories of Royal Corps of Transport

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

Royal Corps of Transport (VR), 1 Sqn RCT in 1975

Written by Tony Dugard

tHIS WAS WHERE WE HAD TO DO TRANSPORT RUNS UP THE PAN HANDLE IN THE OLD BEDFORD RLS, WITH A STEN GUN TUCKED UNDER OUR FEET, AS WE WENT THROUGH THE TURKISH HELD SENTRY POINTS WE WOULD TURN OFF THE IGNITION AND LET THE TRUCK RUN A FEW FEET IN GEAR AS WE APPROACH THE SENTRY TURN THE IGNITION ON TO MAKE HIM JUMP, YOU THERE WEAPONS WERE LOADED AND SAFTEY OFF AT ALL TIMES AND THEY ALWAYS HAD THERE FINGER OVER THE NOZZLE, SO IF THEY JUMPED ENOUGH THE GUN WOULD GO OFF.
WE WERE BASED IN THE AIRPORT AT NICOSIA, I RAN THE TRANSPORT SECTION AS WELL AS BEING THE O,C `S DRIVER NOW AND THEN, WE HAD THE TURKS ON ONE SIDE OF US AND THE GREEKS ON THE OTHER, A COUPLE OF TIMES WE WOULD HAVE MUNITIONS COMMING OVER OUR CAMP WHILE WE WERE IN THE TRENCHES, WHEN IT WAS QUITE WE WOULD BE IN THE WHEEL HOUSE, OUR SQUADRON BAR.
THE TORU IN CYPRUS WAS A GOOD ONE IN THAT WE DID NOT LOOSE ANY ONE, WE HAD OUR SHARE OF ACCIDENTS AS A SQUADRON BUT ONLY MINOR, DURING OUR TIME OFF WE WOULD RUN DOWN TO DEKHELIA BEACH, THERE WAS A ROUTE WHERE THE TURKS PLACED MINES IN THE ROAD AT NIGHT AND IT WAS A BIT DODGY DURRING THE DAY, BUT THERE LINES WERE NEVER IN THE SAME PLACE THEY WERE ALWAYS MOVING,

Royal Corps of Transport in 2010

Taken from the Driffield Times: April 24, 1915
THE EAST YORKS WAGGONERS’ RESERVE
The following lines have been forwarded to us by one who is interested in the doings of our brave Waggoners, especially those from the neighbourhood of Driffield, which we gladly insert: -
Have you read the wondrous story of our soldiers out in France, How they shell the German trenches – how they make the Germans dance; What a thousand pities, brother, of the Waggoners’ Reserve.
All honour to the infantry, who fight both day and night; To the cavalry, who charge the foe, in the cause of Truth and Right, The artillery have made a name, none but the brave deserve, Side by side with them, my brother, write the Waggoners’ Reserve.
Out rang the call one morning, and they answered to a man, Leaving fields all white with harvest, that strong Yorkshire clan; Somewhere in France you’ll find them, with the Regiment they serve; Have you quite forgotten them, brother, they’re the Waggoners’ Reserve.
When this dreadful war is over, and our boys come home again, We will cheer them to the echo, we will shout with might and main; We’re proud of Tommy Atkins, may God his life preserve, But don’t forget his comrades, of the Waggoners’ Reserve.

Regiment Royal Corps of Transport, 68 sqdn RCT in 1967

Written by George Hunter

Good memories of the unit,the SHACK,the Josh House & all the other drinking holes,and all my freinds
married to Sgt T.M. BREEN in April 1970

Regiment Royal Corps of Transport, Regiment Royal Corps of Transport, 6 Infantry Brigade, Munster, B in 1963

Written by Dave Buckingham

Wonderful memories of such luxuries as; Ten pin bowling with Sgt. Len Rann (you still around Len?) Camp Du Larzac in Aveyron, France, nights out in the Astoria bar. Does anyone know the whereabouts of Colin Eccles, Alfie Holdcroft, Nigel Boocock from Munster days at 206 Signal Squadron?
From Munster (BFPO 34) I went onto 3 Squadron RCT in Malacca, Malaysia. What an incredible time it was too. Managed to travel all over Asia, compliment of Her Majesty. Malaya, Thailand, Hong Kong, Singapore, Vietnam (that was a bit different) Exercises in the Cameron Highlands, Quantan, Kuala Terengannu, Dungun, Kuala Lipis, Port Dickson, wonderful times.
From Malacca on to Colchester for my remaining 2 years. Only 60 miles from home so plenty of weekend hitch hiking to Norwich. Great times were had here also. Even an exercise back in Malaysia, great.

Royal Corps of Transport (VR), 7 SQN RCT TIDWORTH in 1975

Written by GORDON ODELL

ANOTHER CUSHIE POSTING DESPITE THIS BEING THE BIGGEST BULLSHIT SQN IN THE RCT, BEST KNOWN AS SHINY SEVEN SQN.
Down arrow Up arrow 2 people in our WW1 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 1 people in our WW2 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 333 people in our Post WW2 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 244 people in our Forces Reunited records
Filter by Surname:
1

Active From: 1965 - 1993

One moment...