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Unit History: RAF Cosford

RAF Cosford
RAF Cosford opened in 1938 as a joint aircraft maintenance, storage and technical training unit. It has remained mainly a training unit to this day. The Fulton Mess barrack block was constructed just before WW2 as the largest single building barrack block in the UK. It is now used for technical training.
 
A substantial PMRAFNS hospital was established at RAF Cosford, the most westerly such RAF hospital in the UK. Constructed of wooden spurred hutting the hospital closed in 1976 and was demolished in 1980. For the three summers between 1977 and 1979 the empty hospital formed the venue for annual training camps for the Royal Observer Corps, with wards and theatres converted into barrack accommodation and training rooms.
 
The extensive sports facilities at Cosford, based around a banked indoor running track, became well known nationally through televised annual indoor championships that featured top athletes from all over the world

Memories of RAF Cosford

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

RAF COSFORD in 1972

Written by Adrian Gogerly

IN 1972 WHEN I WAS STATIONED AT COSFORD I HELP RUN THE CAMP RADIO STATION.
IS THERE ANYONE OUT THER THAT CAN REMEMBER WORKING ON THE THE RADIO STATION BETWEEN 1972 AND 1974.
I DO REMEMBER ONE PERSON WHO WHENT BY HIS RADIO NAME OF MIKE ENGLISH.
I JUST WOULD LIKE TO REMINISCE WITH ALL ABOUT THE TIME WE HAD ON THE RADIO STATION.

RAF Cosford, in 1973

Written by Eddie Billington

Remember the sports competition called "The Wandering Pot" played between sections at whatever the challenging section chose. SSQ and Dental section put a scratch team and challenged the holders at 5-a-side soccer, winning the trophy for a while. Training included doing ’mad medleys’ in the pool at lunchtime. Were we fit or what???

RAF Cosford, Boy Entrants 48th Entry Telegs in 1963

Written by Mike Sinnott

Please view our website on URL : http://48th-telegs.coffeecup.com/

RAF Cosford, Boy Entrant 310th Entry in 1967

Written by David Hamilton (Paddy)

At 17yrs of age on first day we were invited to sign for 9Yrs or 12Yrs. Once the ink had dried there was no turning back. There was no such thing as having a change of mind or having second thoughts you had signed and that was it. Trained as a Telegraphist using teleprinters and morse code. Lost all our civilian clothes and issued with everything RAF including underpants. Confined to camp for the first three months I recall, virtual prisoners. When I did get my first leave I had to travel back home to N Ireland in uniform.
After three months you did get weekend passes, Saturday only but that was a privelage that could be withdrawn for the slightest of excuses and you spent the time in the cookhouse cleaning pans and cookers. Wolverhampton was the nearest town/city but you had to wear uniform. Talk about sticking out like a sore thumb. You couldn,t do anything except behave yourself or suffer the consequences if identified misbehaving.You might meet a girl but you had no way of keeping in contact except by letter. No Mobiles/Internet.
Rifle drill was a daily occurrence. Lee Enfield 303’s with fixed bayonet. We had to march everywhere with those steel studded boots. Good for raising sparks also keeping in step when marching. Those dammed officers demanded a salute everytime you encountered one. We had our own band, bunch of amatuers but a bit of fun when we marched down the road swaying from side to side with the music. Funny the 303’s were withdrawn after our training and I never did rifle drill with the SLR’s but was still expected to know how.
The barrack room in Fulton Block contained more than 20 beds. The floor was constantly polished and gleaming. We walked around with square pieces of blanket on our feet. Constant inspections of lockers and beds with all our kit layed out on display. Folded bed packs. Recall an inspection whilst we were out doing rifle drill and coming back to the room to find lockers overturned and water thrown down the centre of the floor. The place always smelt of polish and brasso. What you would have given for a room to yourself.
You got paid every two weeks, not your full pay but an allowance. The pay was in cash, only rich people had bank accounts. Pay parade was no casual affair. The officer would give you the once over after you gave the usual salute. Any excuse and he would have you in the cookhouse that weekend. I always had trouble with the salute in which case I had to go back to the end of the queue again to salute a second time. I hated those arrogant snobs with the customary posh accent. I think our officer hated us for him being posted to Cosford. He was a Phantom pilot and he never missed the opportunity of telling us. Had the usual handlebar moustache.
Through Forces Reunited I have made a few contacts with those I served with in Training. 310th Entry RAF Cosford. Some have sadly passed away others went on to do do greater things but when I hear some of those 60’s songs of the time the memories come flooding back. The 60’s was a good time to be a teenager and Britain was the place to be. Discipline was tight in training and even afterwards but it didn’t do us any harm. Honesty, Decency and Respect for your Comrades were common values. How society has changed.
Morse Code and use of Teleprinters arent much use to us these days but I can touch type on a computer keyboard. I learnd at least something useful during my RAF Service.
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Active From: 1938 - Present

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