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Unit History: Royal Scots

Royal Scots
The Royal Scots is the oldest Infantry Regiment of the Line in the British Army and can trace its history back to 1633.  King Charles I was on the Throne at the time who had married Henrietta Maria of France, the youngest sister of King Louis XIII of France.  Charles I issued a Royal Warrant in 1633 for Sir John Hepburn to raise a Scottish Regiment to serve in France as Garde Écossaise; the bodyguard of King Louis XIII and the Regiment went on to serve during the Thirty Years War (1618–1648), losing three Colonels in various actions in 38 years.
 
Due to the Royal Warrant the Regiment remained part of the British standing Army and could be recalled to Britain at any time.  Britain was plunged into Civil War from 1642 until 1649 when Charles I lost his head and the Commonwealth of England was declared.  The Regiment remained in France during this turmoil and was not recalled to Britain until 1661, following Oliver Cromwell’s death in 1658 and the abdication of his son as Lord Protector in 1659.  After the first elections in 20 years, Parliament was reformed and proclaimed Charles II as King and invited him to return to England from exile in 1660.  In 1661 the Regiment was finally recalled to England, to plug the gap between the disbandment of the Cromwell’s New Model Army and the creation of a Regular Army, in which the Regiment became the model for all other units.
 
The Regiment returned to France for two more periods 1662–66 and 1667–78 and saw English service again during the Second Anglo-Dutch War (1665-67) fighting at the Dutch Raid on the Medway. It was not until 1678 when the regiment was finally a permanent part of the English establishment.  It achieved its first Battle Honour in 1680 when it served in Tangier, which Charles II had received as part of Catherine of Braganza’s marriage dowry.  Unfortunately Tangier had been a contested territory between Morocco and Portugal for years and in 1680 the Moroccans increased their military pressure in the region.  It eventually proved too expensive to keep Tangier and it was abandoned in 1684.  Upon the Regiments return it was awarded the title ‘The Royal Regiment of Foot’.  Charles II died suddenly in 1685 and was succeeded by his unpopular brother James II who was quickly plunged into suppressing mounting discontent, during the Monmouth rebellion of 1685.  James Scott the 1st Duke of Monmouth (the illegitimate son of Charles II and the King’s nephew) unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow the unpopular King.  The Regiment was part of the force which swiftly put down Monmouth’s small force at the Battle of Sedgemoor. James II would only manage to retain the throne for three years before being deposed by his brother-in-law William III.
 
The Regiment went on to serve during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714), the Austrian War of Succession (1740–48), fighting at the Battle of Fontenoy.  The Regiment returned to England in 1745 when Bonnie Prince Charlie (the grandson of James II) landed in Scotland, attempting to regain the lost crown to the Stuart family and fought at the Battle of Culloden.
 
In 1751 the Regimental naming system was simplified with each Regiment assigned a number rank instead of naming after their current colonel therefore the Regiment became the First Regiment of Foot.  The Regiment went on to serve during the Seven Years War (1756-63) fighting in Canada and the West Indies including at the Capture of Montreal (1760) and Havana (1762).  Disease was the biggest killer in the West Indies at this time, over 40,000 British men were lost between 1793 and 1796, the Regiment alone lost over 400 men during these three years.
 
The Regiment was expanded to four battalions during the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815), which meant the Regiment was present in all the Theatres of War at the time; this included the Americas, Egypt, the West Indies and India as well as Europe.  Therefore the Regiment fought at the Battles of St Lucia, Corunna, Busaco, Salamanca, Vittoria, St Sebastian, Nivelle, Peninsula and Waterloo.
 
The Regiment went on to serve in India during the Third Mahratta War (1817-1819) and the First Anglo-Burmese War (1824-1826) fighting at the Battles of Nagpore, Maheidpoor, Ava. The Regiment then served during the Crimean War (1854 – 1856) fighting at the Battles of Alma; Inkermann; Sevastopol.  The Regiment also served during the Second Boer War (1899-1902), mostly as a mobile unit patrolling and raiding and during two World Wars.
 
The Regiment celebrated its 350th Anniversary in 1983 and Queen Elizabeth II appointed her daughter, Princess Anne, as the Colonel-in-Chief to commemorate the occasion.  Until 2004, the Royal Scots was one of only five line infantry Regiments never to have been amalgamated in its entire history this included; The Green Howards, The Cheshire Regiment, The Royal Welch Fusiliers and The King's Own Scottish Borderers.  However, in 2004 it was amalgamated with the King's Own Scottish Borderers to form The Royal Scots Borderers. In 2006 the Regiment once again amalgamated, with The Highlanders, The Royal Highland Fusiliers, The Black Watch, and The Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders to form the Royal Regiment of Scotland.

Royal Scots during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised a total of 35 Battalions and received 71 Battle Honours and 6 Victoria Crosses, losing 11,162 men during the course of the War.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed in Allahabad at the outbreak of war.
16.11.19174 Returned to England and landed at Devonport, Plymouth and then moved to Winchester joining the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
20.12.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1915
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
29.11.1915 Embarked for Salonika from Marseilles arriving 08.12.1915 and engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army including;
1916
The capture of Karajakois, The capture of Yenikoi, The battle of Tumbitza Farm.
1917
The capture of Homondos.
1918
The capture of the Roche Noir Salient, The passage of the Vardar River and The pursuit to the Strumica valley.
30.09.1918 Ended the war in Izlis N.W. of Doiran, Bulgaria.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Plymouth as part of the 8th Brigade of the 3rd Division.
14.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of Le Cateau, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battles of La Bassee and Messines 1914, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The First Attack on Bellewaarde, The Actions of Hooge, The Second Attack on Bellewaarde.
1916
The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Cambrai 1917.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Solesmes, France.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Glencorse, Edinburgh.
Aug 1914 Moved to Weymouth.
May 1915 Moved to Edinburgh.
End 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Mullingar until the end of the war.

1/4th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Forrest Hill, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
24.05.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Liverpool via Alexandria.
14.06.1915 Landed at Gallipoli.
06.07.1915 Formed composite Battalion with the 1/7th Battalion and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including;
The Battles of Gully Ravine, Achi Baba Nullah, Krithia Nullahs, The evacuation of Helles.
08.01.1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
20.01.1916 Resumed identity as 1/4th Battalion and took over defences of the Suez Canal before engaging in the Palestine Campaign;
Dueidar, The Battle of Romani.
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, Wadi el Hesi, Burqa, El Maghar, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil, The Battle of Jaffa.
17.04.1918 Moved to France arriving at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Herchies N.W. of Mons, Belgium.

1/5th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Forrest Hill, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
11.03.1915 Moved to Leamington and transferred to the 88th Brigade of the 29th Division.
20.03.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Avonmouth via Alexandria.
25.04.1915 Landed at Gallipoli and engaged in various action against the Turkish Army including;
First Battle of Krithia, the Second Battle of Krithia, the Third Battle of Krithia, the Battle of Gully Ravine, the Battle of Krithia Vineyard, the Battle of Scimitar Hill.
18.10.1915 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
07.01.1916 Moved to Egypt.
10.03.1916 Embarked for France at Port Said landing at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
24.04.1916 Left the 29th Division and move to defend the Lines of Communication.
15.06.1916 Amalgamated with the 1/6th Battalion forming the 4/6th Battalion.
29.07.1916 Joined the 14th Brigade of the 32nd Division at Bethune.
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.
1918
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Avesnelles near Avesnes, France.

1/6th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Gilmore Place, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division). Supplied drafts to the 4th and 8th Battalions.
Aug 1915 Moved to the Selkirk and Peebles and then moved to Edinburgh.
05.09.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Alexandria from Devonport, Plymouth arriving 14.09.1915.
20.11.1915 – 27.02.1916 Part of the Western Frontier Force, which engaged in suppressing Arab and Berber tribes west of British-controlled Egypt. They had been agitated by German and Turkish propaganda and fuelled by German money. The tribes engaged in various hostile acts against the frontier posts but in three months the main threat had been overcome.
16.05.1916 Moved to France landing at Marseilles.
15.06.1916 Amalgamated with the 1/5th Battalion forming the 4/6th Battalion.
29.07.1916 Joined the 14th Brigade of the 32nd Division at Bethune which engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.
1918
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Amiens, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Avesnelles near Avesnes, France.

1/7th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Dalmeny Street, Leith as part of the Lothian Brigade.
24.04.1915 Transferred to the Scottish Rifles Brigade of the Lowland Division (became the 52nd Division).
24.05.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Liverpool via Alexandria. (22.05.1915 227 Officers and men were killed and 246 injured in a train crash transferring men of A & D companies from Larbert to Liverpool, near Gretna Green.)
14.06.1915 Landed at Gallipoli
Gully Ravine, Achi Baba Nullah, Krithia Nullahs, The evacuation of Helles.
06.07.1915 Formed composite Battalion with the 1/7th Battalion.
08.01.1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather.
20.01.1916 Resumed identity as 1/4th Battalion and took over a section of the Suez Canal defences until engaged in the Palestine Campaign including;
Dueidar, The Battle of Romani.
1917
The First Battle of Gaza, The Second Battle of Gaza, The Third Battle of Gaza, Wadi el Hesi, Burqa, El Maghar, The capture of Junction Station, The Battle of Nabi Samweil, The Battle of Jaffa.
17.04.1918 Moved to France arriving at Marseilles and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Herchies N.W. of Mons, Belgium.

1/8th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Haddington as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
05.11.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre.
11.11.1914 Transferred to the 22nd Brigade of the 7th Division at Merris which engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1915
The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Festubert, The second action of Givenchy.
19.08.1915 Transferred to the 51st Division as a Pioneer Battalion;
1916
The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The capture and defence of Roeux, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Menin Road Ridge, The tank attack, The capture of Bourlon Wood, The German counter attacks,
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of the Tardenois, The Battle of the Scarpe, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Estrun, north of Cambrai, France.

1/9th (Highlanders) Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Claremont Street, Edinburgh as part of the Lothian Brigade of the Coast Defences, Scottish Command (which became 156 Brigade of the 52nd Division).
26.02.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre joining the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
24.11.1915 Transferred to the 14th Brigade of the 5th Division.
01.03.1916 Transferred to the 154th Brigade of the 15th Division.
1916
German gas attacks near Hulluch, The defence of the Kink position, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilckem, The Battle of Langemark.
06.02.1918 Transferred to the 183rd Brigade of the 61st Division;
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Estaires,
The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune.
01.06.1918 Transferred to the 46th Brigade of the 15th Division;
The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Soissonnais, The attack on Buzancy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Pipaix east of Tournai, Belgium.

1/10th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Linlithglow and then moved to East Linton as part of the Coast Defences at North Berwick.
April 1918 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Claremorris, Curragh & Port Arlington.
1916 over 90% of original personnel overseas.

2/4th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh.
Feb 1915 Moved to Penicuik and then Peebles.
Nov 1915 Moved to Cambusbarron and amalgamated with the 2/5th and 2/6th Battalions to form 19th Battalion and joined the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division.
Jan 1916 Became the 2/4th Battalion again.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex and joined the 65th Division.
Jan 1917 Moved to Fermoy, Ireland.
Aug 1917 Absorbed into the Battalions of the 195th Brigade.

2/5th & 2/6th Battalion (Queen’s Edinburgh Rifles) Territorial Force
Sept 1914 2/5th formed at Edinburgh.
Mar 1915 2/6th formed at Edinburgh.
May 1915 Both moved to Peebles.
Nov 1915 Moved to Cambusbarron and amalgamated with the 2/5th and 2/6th Battalions to form 19th Battalion and joined the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division.

2/7th Battalion Territorial Force
Aug 1914 Formed at Leith.
Mar 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Larbert to join the 194th Brigade of the 65th Division.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed in Dublin.
Sept 1917 Moved to Curragh.
Mar 1918 Disbanded and Category A & B men transferred to the 4th (reserve) Battalion.

2/8th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Haddington.
May 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Falkirk to join the 194th Brigade of the 65th Division and became the No. 16 Battalion.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Dublin.
Summer 1917 Disbanded and absorbed into the 194th Brigade.

2/9th (Highlanders) Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh.
May 1915 Moved to Peebles and then Tillicoultry to join the 195th Brigade of the 65th Division and became the No. 20 Battalion.
Mar 1916 Moved to Essex.
Jan 1917 Moved to Ireland and stationed at Tralee.
July 1917 Moved to Limerick.
Mar 1918 Disbanded and absorbed into the 194th Brigade.

2/10th (Cyclist) Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed at Linlithglow and then moved to Bathgate.
1915 Part of the Coast Defences at Berwick & Coldingham.
June 1918 Moved to Ireland at Dundalk and became Infantry Battalion.
July 1918 Moved to Aldershot.
25.08.1918 Embarked for Russia from Newcastle arriving at Archangel and remained there until June 1919.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th 3/7th & 3/8th Battalion Territorial Force
May – July 1915 Formed at Peebles except 3/8th which formed in Dec 1914.
Nov 1915 The 3/4th moved to Loanhead, the 3/5th moved to Galashiels, the 3/6th moved to Selkirk, the 3/7th moved to Innerleithen and the 3/8th remained at Peeble.
08.04.1916 All became Reserve Battalions and moved to Stobs Camp.
01.09.1916 Amalgamated into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion as part of the Lowland Reserve Brigade Territorial Force and moved to Catterick.
June 1917 Absorbed the 9th (Reserve) Battalion.
Nov 1917 Moved to Edinburgh and joined the Edinburgh Special Reserve Brigade.
April 1918 Moved to Haddington and then Cupar.

3/9th Battalion Territorial Force
June 1915 Formed at Peebles and then moved to Selkirk.
08.04.1916 Became the 9th (Reserve) Battalion.
May 1916 Moved to Stobs Camp.
01.09.1916 Joined the Lowland Reserve Brigade Territorial Force at Catterick.
June 1917 Absorbed into the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.

11th & 12th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Edinburgh and then moved to Bordon, Aldershot as part of the First New Army (K1), joining the 27th Brigade of the 9th Division.
May 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The First Battle of Passchendaele, The action of Welsh Ridge.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel, The Second Battle of Kemmel, The Advance in Flanders, The Final Advance in Flanders, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Ooteghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Courtrai, Belgium.

13th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Edinburgh and then moved to Aldershot as part of the Second New Army (K2), joining the 45th Brigade of the 15th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Bramshott, then Basingstoke and then Chisledon.
July 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos
1916
German gas attacks near Hulluch, The defence of the Kink position, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Pilckem, The Battle of Langemark.
1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Soissonnais, The attack on Buzancy, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Blicquy S.W. of Ath, Belgium.

14th (Service) Battalion
Nov 1914 Formed as a service Battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) as part of the 102nd Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.04.1915 Became 2nd Reserve Battalion and moved to Stobs Camp.
Oct 1915 Moved to Richmond and joined the 12th Reserve Battalion.
April 1916 Moved to South Queensferry.
01.09.1916 Moved to Kirkcaldy and became the 54th Training Reserve Battalion of the 12th Reserve Brigade.

15th (Service) Battalion (1st Edinburgh)
Sept 1914 Formed by the Lord Provost and the City in Edinburgh.
1915 Moved to Troon and then Ripon and joined the 101st Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Sutton Veny.
08.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt (August), The Third Battles of Ypres (fighting for the Broenbeek, 13-23 October 1917).
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
16.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to the 39th Division and engaged in supervising courses of instruction for American troops.
14.08.1918 Disbanded in France.

16th (Service) Battalion (2nd Edinburgh)
Dec 1914 Formed by Lieutenant-Colonel G McCrae MP in Edinburgh.
June 1915 Moved to Ripon and joined the 101st Brigade of the 34th Division.
10.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Sutton Veny.
08.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt (August), The Third Battles of Ypres (fighting for the Broenbeek, 13-23 October 1917).
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
16.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to the 39th Division and engaged in supervising courses of instruction for American troops.
14.08.1918 Disbanded in France.

17th (Service) Battalion (Roseberry)
Feb 1915 Formed by Lord Rosebury and local committee in Edinburgh as a bantam Battalion.
April 1915 Moved to Glencorse and then Selkirk and Masham and joined the 106th Brigade of the 35th Division.
03.07.1915 Taken over by the war office and then moved to Chisledon.
01.02.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The fighting for Arrow Head Copse and Maltz Horn Farm, The fighting for Falfemont Farm.
1917
The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The fighting in Houthulst Forest, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Tieghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war west of Grammont, Belgium.

18th (Reserve) Battalion
June 1915 Formed from the depot companies of the 15th 16th & 17th Battalions in Edinburgh as a local reserve battalion.
Oct 1915 Moved to Ripon and then Dundee.
01.09.1916 Became the 77th Training Reserve Battalion of the 18th Reserve Brigade.

19th (Labour) Battalion
April 1916 Formed at Blairgowrie
April 1916 Moved to France.
April 1917 Transferred to Labour Corps (1st & 2nd Labour Companies).

1st Garrison Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed in Edinburgh and then moved to Stobs Camp.
Oct 1915 Moved to Mudros.
Feb 1916 Moved to Egypt and Cyprus until the end of the war.

2nd (Home Service) Garrison Battalion
Aug 1916 Formed at Leith and became the 1st Battalion Royal Defence Corps.

Royal Scots during WW2

At the outbreak of the Second World War, the 1st Battalion was at Aldershot as part of 4th Infantry Brigade, 2nd Division; accordingly, it deployed to France with the British Expeditionary Force. It moved to Lecelles in September, and in May 1940 moved into Belgium during the Battle of France. The British forces were heavily hit by the German breakthrough, however, and fell back towards the coast; the battalion was deployed at Le Paradis, near Béthune, on May 25 to protect the flanks of the Dunkirk evacuation. After being heavily hit by armoured attacks, the battalion ceased fighting on the afternoon of the 27th. The adjacent unit, the 2nd Royal Norfolk Regiment, had almost one hundred men taken prisoner and later shot by their captors in the "Le Paradis massacre". Recent research has suggested that around twenty Royal Scots may have suffered a similar fate. The remnants of the battalion were reconstituted in Bradford in June.

The two Territorial units, the 7/9th and 8th Battalions, mobilised in Scotland in September; the 7/9th was briefly deployed to France before the collapse of the French government, but was quickly withdrawn. A fifth battalion, the 12th, was formed in 1940.

Most of 1941 passed without active duty for the regiment, and with growing concerns about the stability of the Far East, the 2nd Battalion, still based at Hong Kong, moved into defensive positions around the colony. These fears materialised on December 8, when the Battle of Hong Kong began a few hours after the attack on Pearl Harbor; after bitter fighting, the garrison surrendered on Christmas Day. The newly-formed 12th Battalion was disbanded and reformed as the 2nd Battalion in May 1942.

In April 1942 the 1st Battalion was moved to Bombay, and then to Chittagong in December with 2nd Division. It fought in the Burma Campaign, first seeing action in the Arakan operations from March to May 1943, and then withdrawing into India. It later saw action at the Battle of Kohima in 1944 and the Battle of Mandalay in 1945. It was withdrawn to India to refit in April 1945, and moved to Singapore in December.

The 2nd Battalion moved to Gibraltar in April 1943, and moved to Italy in July 1944, where it saw action in the Italian Campaign. In January 1945 it moved to Palestine, where it was active in security duties in October and November, and was then redeployed to the Suez Canal Zone in December.
Infantry of 8th Royal Scots in Kangaroo APCs, December 1944

The 7th/9th Battalion was part of 52nd (Lowland) Division, which trained for mountain and airlanding operations, but was never used in this way. In October 1944 it moved to the Netherlands, fighting in the Battle of the Scheldt and participating in the advance to the Rhine; it crossed the Rhine in March 1945 and advanced to Bremen by the end of the war.

The 8th Battalion remained in the UK as part of 15th (Scottish) Division until June 1944, when it landed in Normandy as part of Operation Overlord. It fought in north-west Europe until the end of the war; it entered Belgium in September, crossed the Rhine in March 1945 and advanced to Hamburg by the end of the war

Memories of Royal Scots

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

The ROYAL SCOTS Training Camp at Dreghorn near EDINBURGH in 1950

Written by Matt. P. Rooney

I went into the Army at the Royal Scots Training Depot Dreghorn Barracks near Edinburgh, it was December and bitterly cold that I do remember, initially I had been declared fit and was A1, now that was fine as I was keen to be a Soldier [just like my DAD during the WW1 campaign,] having endured most of the training, including the morning rush to the Mess Hall to have unsalted Porridge and inedible kippers, mindful of the 28 shillings a week, I seemed to spend most of my time at the Naafi eating eggs and chips to take away the taste of the Kippers. The Staff then decided to ask all those National Servicemen mer included if we would like to sign on, a lot of us said no with the result that us lot had to have another Medical where we were downgraded to B4, I still continued with the training until the 7th week and was temporally assigned to the Regimental Police, I cannot remember what the rest did but they were all assigned other duties,we then were told we were being transferred to a Holding Camp in England a place called OSWESTRY near CHESTER, having had weekend passes to go Home and see our Families, I did'nt have far to go as I stayed at BONNYRIGG 6 miles from the CAMP. we then were taken to Waverley Railway Station and with an N.C.O.and an Officer in attendance put on the train for our NEW ADVENTURE. More of that in the next installment. So ended my time with the ROYAL SCOTS at DREGHORN BARRACKS EDINBURGH.

Royal Scots Greys, RAC bury st edmonds suffolk in 1945

Written by frncis manson

my daughter was born.

Royal Scots Dragoon Guards, in 1972

Written by JAMES MILLAR HILL

HIGHLY HONOURED WHEN AMAZING GRACE WENT TO NO1 IN THE CHARTS.

Royal Scots (Lothian Regiment), Berlin in 1957

Written by Jim Robertson

2 years in Berlin have some great Memories of Montgomery Bks, & the exercises we did in the Gruniwald Area. with the Mortar Platoon.
Berlin with ! KOSB, spent 18 happy months again with the mortar platoon.

Royal Scots Fusiliers, in 1950

Written by EDWARD McVEAN

My matchless motor bike was flattened by a tank outside the signal office at 54 RHU at Bielefeld in 1950.
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