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Unit History: Coldstream Guards

Coldstream Guards
The Regiment was first formed in 1650 at Berwick, Northumberland as ‘Monck’s Regiment of Foot’ during the English Civil War, by Colonel George Monck as part of the English Parliamentarian forces.  It was soon in action at the Battle of Dunbar, where the New model Army of Oliver Cromwell defeated a Scottish army loyal to King Charles II, who was proclaimed King of Scots and attempted to regain the throne taken from his father.
 
The Regiment remained in Scotland until the abdication of Richard Cromwell (son of Oliver Cromwell) in 1659.  Colonel Monck crossed his Regiment into England at the village of Coldstream and made a five week march to London in order to support the restoration of the Stuart Monarchy.  Colonel Monck was awarded the Order of the Garter for his support and the Regiment was assigned to keep order in London.  In January 1661 a serious uprising occurred in London when 50 ‘Fifth Monarchists’, attempted to take possession of London in the name of ‘King Jesus.’  The Regiment was deployed and quashed the riots.  After this the King wished to retain the Regiment for his personal security; however he already had a bodyguard Regiment, formed during his exile in 1656 as the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards, which subsequently became the Grenadier Guards.  In 1661 the Regiment symbolically laid down their arms as part of the New Model Army and were immediately ordered to take them up again as the Royal Regiment of ‘The Lord General's Regiment of Foot Guards’.
 
Being the older Regiment it should have had seniority in the Household Troops but was placed as the second senior Regiment, after the 1st Regiment of Foot Guards.  Subsequently it adopted the motto Nulli Secundus (Second to None), and always stands on the left of the line when on parade with rest of the Foot Guards.  In 1670 when Colonel Monck died, the Earl of Craven took command and the Regiment adopted the new name of Coldstream Regiment of Foot Guards.  The Regiment went on to serve during the Monmouth Rebellion in 1865, when the 1st Duke of Monmouth (and the King’s nephew) unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow the unpopular King James II, fighting at the decisive Battle of Sedgemoor.  It also went on to serve during the Nine Years War (1688–97) against the French fighting at the Battle of Walcourt, the Battle of Landen and the Siege of Namur.
 
The Regiment went on to serve during the Seven Years War (1754–1763) fighting at the Battle of Wilhelmstal and at the Castle of Arnoneberg.  It also served during the American War of Independence ((1775–1783), the French Revolution (1789–1799) and the Napoleonic Wars (1803–1815).  It was part of the unsuccessful Walcheren Expedition (1809) during the War of the Fifth Coalition and was also fought at the chateau of Hougoumont as part of the Battle of Waterloo (1815).  The defence of Hougoumont is considered one of the greatest achievements of the Regiment.  Corporal James Graham and Lt-Col James Macdonnell led the closing of the farmhouse gates which helped to successfully hold the ground with few men and aided The Duke of Wellington to win the Battle of Waterloo, as a Napoleon diverted his troops to the area.  In 1855 the Regiment adopted the title of The Coldstream Guards and then went on to serve during the Second Boer War and two World Wars.

Coldstream Guards during WW1

During the First World War the Regiment gained 36 Battle Honours and 7 Victoria Crosses, losing 3,860 men during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Aldershot as part of the 1st (Guards) Brigade of the 1st Division.
Aug 1914 Mobilised for war and move to France as part of the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F.) and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Loos.
25.08.1915 Transferred to the 2nd (Guards) Brigade of the same Division.
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France near Maubeuge.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1917 Stationed at Windsor as part of the 4th (Guards) Brigade of the 2nd Division.
13.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre as part of the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F.) and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos.
20.08.1915 Transferred to the 1st (Guards) Brigade of the same Division.
1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France N.E. of Maubeuge.

3rd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Chelsea Barracks, London as part of the 4th (Guards) Brigade of the 2nd Division.
13.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed in Havre as part of the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F.) and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The Battle of Festubert, The Battle of Loos.
20.08.1915 Transferred to the 1st (Guards) Brigade of the same Division.
1916
The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre, Operations on the Ancre.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Cambrai.
08.02.1918 Transferred to the 4th (Guards) Brigade of the 31st Division.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Defence of Nieppe Forest.
20.05.1918 Transferred to G.H.Q. Reserve.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Criel Plage S.W. of Le Treport.

4th Battalion (Pioneers)
17.07.1915 Formed at Windsor as the Guards Pioneer Battalion then became the 4th Battalion.
15.08.1915 Mobilised for war and Deployed to France joining the Guards Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos
1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval,
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Pilkem, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Poelkapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele, The Battle of Cambrai 1917.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The battles marked, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Havrincourt, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France near Maubeuge.

5th (Reserve) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Windsor as the 4th (Reserve) Battalion.
July 1915 Became the 5th (Reserve) Battalion. Remained stationed at Windsor throughout the war.

1st Provisional Battalion
07.08.1918 Formed at Aldershot for duty at the Senior Officers School.

Memories of Coldstream Guards

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

Coldstream Guards, London in 1969

Written by John Thomas Smith

Frank Scarth,lasting 24hrs as l/Sgt after stripping in mess,shouting,Baby,
Aden,swimming in the Lido,under armed guard. 1965/66 Forgot its name
Public duties,Both as Guardsman and L/sgt.
Suffered a Brain Heammoreage in 1994 so most of my memories erased so anyone who knows me contact.

Coldstream Guards, road blocks aden in 1966

Written by joe(seth)adams

six on 12 off week in week out. radfan was not bad bit cooler spell at monks field never forget the smell of down town aden l was 17 welcome to the real world then germany and the cold cant hack the cold australia has been good to me such is life as ned kelly said.............

Coldstream Guards, ADEN in 1965

Written by JOHN .T,SMITH

Leading the camel suplies up the track to Hotel 10

Coldstream Guards, Pirbright in 1983

Written by Chris Parkinson

Knightsbridge 2 Platoon & Knightsbridge Shooting Platoon. Les Woolaston, Andy Obridge, Dave Wilson, Lcpl/Horse Monkton, Mike Norman, Kenny Dorkins, Sid Harding, QMSI Redman - All depot Staff.
Lads - Mark ’Eggy’ Etherington, Bruno Brooks, barry Crane, Smudge Smith, Taff Evans, Sherbourne, Wheatley, Carroll, Forest - Lost all my photos in a stolen MFO box in transit form Hong Kong 1988 - Can anyone fill in the gaps?

Coldstream Guards, in 1965

at the guards depot we were taken into london to be on hand to put salt on the roads at winston churchills funeral as it was we were not needed but we were able to watch some of it
our time in aden the time we spent up country its good to have memories like this
british honduras was great place to be got a good tan in this place plus i did my cpl coarse no more fatigues
germany it was a nice start for a 17yr old to travel abroad and agood place to be when england won the world cup
got to see many parts of the world including usa we did the training their army was doing for vietnam got the compliment that if the british army had been involved the war would have been won
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