Queen’s (King’s) Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air

This form of award was instituted in 1939 by King George VI and continued to 1994 when replaced by the Queen’s Commendation for Bravery in the Air. Awarded for ‘gallantry or for meritorious service while in the air on the part of civilians or members of the military forces, whether in wartime conflict or peacetime where the action did not merit the award of the Air Force Cross or Air Force Medal’. The first awards were made in 1942.

In the Services, the Mention in Despatches emblem is worn to denote a military commendation for valuable services in the air.

Description:

Ribbon – No Ribbon, the award is worn on the uniform in the form of a silver badge below any medal ribbons held. In civil air line uniform the badge is worn on the panel of the left breast pocket.

Eligibility – Civilians or members of the military forces

Awarded for – Gallantry or for meritorious service while in the air

Established – 1939

Post Nominals - There is no entitlement to a post-nominal and there is no specific ribbon for the award.

Description – The oval silver badge with the wording on two lines ‘FOR VALUABLE SERVICE’, granted to denote a civil King’s or Queen’s Commendation for Valuable Service in the Air, is worn on the coat immediately below any medal or medal ribbons, or in the civil airline uniform, on the panel of the left breast pocket. In the Services, the Mention in Despatches emblem is worn to denote a military commendation for valuable services in the air.

 

Sources:

< gov.uk/medals-campaigns-descriptions-and-eligibility>

Some of the material on this page was also partially derived from

<en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ >

Which are released under the terms of

Creativecommons.org/licenses/by-s/3.0/.

 

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