The Great War Part 244, April 19th 1919

A W E E K LY REVIEW SUPPLEM ENT TO " THE GREAT WAR," PA R T 244. Lord Cavan at Eton General the Earl of Cavan recently paid a visit to Eton, his old school, where he was accorded a great reception and entertained to luncheon. Lord Cavan, addressing the boys, remarked that he had served in the war under three great Etonians — Generals Plumer, Rawlinson, and Byng— and they had taught him much. He, too, owed a great deal to those sons of Eton, of imperishable memory, who had loyally served him all through the war. In 1882, he said, he went to the orderly-room to offer himself as a candidate for what was then known as the E.C.R.V. ; but a “ villain,” with a black beard rejected him. He said, “ Five-three and a b it! Come again next half! ” Happily, during the holidays, he grew that “ bit,” and then he was accepted, and in the course of time he became corporal, then sergeant, and later he reached the rank of tolour-sergeant. They would see, therefore, that he began his career in the ranks before becoming an officer in the 1st Grenadier Regiment of Foot Guards. Vimy Ridge for Canada It is announced that the French Government intends to present Vimy Ridge to Canada. At the same time the Belgian Government has intimated its desire of awarding Canada a grant of land in the city of .Ypres for the purpose of erecting a memorial museum and shrine for Canadian pilgrims to the battlefields of the Ypres salient. Vimy Ridge was captured by the Canadians on April 9th, l'J17, and for nearly two years Canadian troops fought in the locality, which is 'thickly dotted with Canadian graves. A division of Third Fleet has been forjned at Devonport from ships detached from the Grand Fleet. It comprises the, battleships Collingwood, Colossus, and London, the cruisers Apollo, Donegal, Eclipse, Roxburgh, Active, Aurora, Bellona, Liver­ pool, and Narcissus, with the 20 vessels of the Fourth Destroyer Flotilla and 10 torpedo-boats. Historic Cartoons of th e G reat W ar W O M A N - P O W E R . Ceres : “ Speed the plough 1 ” Ploughm an s “ I don’ t know who you are, m a’am , but It’s no good speeding the plough unless we can get the woman to do the harvesting.” [Fifty thousand more women are wanted on the land to take the place of men called to the Colours if the harvest is to be got in.] (Reproduced from P u n c h ,” M ay 15th, 1918, by perm ission o f the Proprietors.) WHY THE KAISER FLED Hindenburg’s Story of the Fateful November Days The following statement recently issued in Berlin by Field-Marshal von Hindenburg throws important light on the events leading up to the Kaiser’s flight: “ Public opinion has been recently again dis­ cussing the question why the Kaiser went to Holland. To obviate erroneous judgments, I should like to make the following brief observations. When the Imperial Chancellor, Prince Max of Baden, announced the Kaiser’s abdication, on November 9th, without the Kaiser’s previous declaration of assent, the German Army was not beaten ; but its strength had dwindled, and the enemy had fresh masses in readiness for a new attack. The conclusion of the armistice was directly impending. “ At this moment of the highest military tension, Revolution broke out in Germany, the insurgents seized the Rhine bridges, important arsenals and traffic centres in the rear of the Army, thereby endangering the supply of ammunition and provi­ sions', while the supplies in the hands of the troops were only enough to last for a few days. “ The troops on the lines of communication and the reserves disbanded themselves, and unfavourable reports arrived concerning the reliability of the Field Army proper. “ In view of this state of affairs, the peaceful return home of the Kaiser was no longer to be thought of, and could only have been enforced at the head of loyal troops. In that case the complete collapse of Germany was inevitable, and civil war would have been added to the fighting with the enemy without, who would doubtless have pressed on with all his energy. “ The Kaiser could, moreover, have betaken him­ self to the fighting troops, in order to seek death at their head in a last attack; but the armistice, so keenly desired by the people, would thereby have been postponed, and the lives of many soldiers uselessly sacrificed. “ Finally, the Kaiser might leave the country. He chose this course in agreement with his advisers, after an extremely severe mental struggle, and solely in the hope that he could thereby best serve the Fatherland, save Germany further losses, distress, and misery, and restore her to peace and order. It was not the Kaiser’s fault that he was of this opinion.” Ypres Salient Casualties The total casualties suffered by the British, Canadian, and Australian troops respectively in the Ypres salient during the operations from July 31st, 1917, and ending on November 18th, 1917, were : * » Officers. Other Ranks. Regulars & Territorial Forces ,. 10,795 207,8:^8 Canadian Contingent 496 11,917 Australian Contingent. 1,289 26,502 These totals include all killed, wounded, and missing (including prisoners), as well as deaths from wounds and other causes. Battle Deaths in the War Battle deaths in tho war of nations, according to figures compiled and announced by General March, Chief of Staff of the United States Army, totalled 7,354,000. These figures include only men killed in battle or who died of wounds. Such losses by nations are as follows : Russia ........................................ 1,700,000 Germany .................................... 1,600,000 France ........................................ 1,305,000 Austria .................................... 800,000 Great Britain ............................. 70(5,000 Ita ly ............................................ 400,000 Turkey .................................. 250,000 Belgium ............. * .................... 102,000 Bulgaria .................................... 100,000 Rumania .................................... 100,000 Serbia and Montenegro .......... 100,000 United States ............................. 50,000
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