BOOK OF THE MONTH : No Mercy from the Japanese

Forces War Records 'Book of the Month' from Pen and Sword Books: No Mercy from the Japanese (Paperback) - A Survivor's Account of the Burma Railway and the Hellships 1942–1945.

A Survivor's Account of the Burma Railway and the Hellships 1942–1945 by Pen & Sword
A Survivor's Account of the Burma Railway and the Hellships 1942–1945 by Pen & Sword

Description

By the laws of statistics John Wyatt should not be here today to tell his story. He firmly believes that someone somewhere was looking after him during those four years. Examine the odds stacked against him and his readers will understand why he hold this view. During the conflict in Malaya and Singapore his regiment lost two thirds of its men. More than three hundred patients and staff in the Alexandra Military Hospital were slaughtered by the Japanese - he was one of the few survivors still alive today. Twenty six percent of British soldiers slaving on the Burma Railway died. More than fifty men out of around six hundred died aboard the Asaka Maru and the Hakasan Maru. Many more did not manage to survive the harshest Japanese winter of 1944/45, the coldest in Japan since record began. John's experiences make for the most compelling and graphic reading. The courage, endurance and resilience of men like him never ceases to amaze.

 

Pen and Sword became established as one of the UK's leading military history publishers. Over recent years the company has continued to grow and has added new imprints to its core area of military history. Pen & Sword now specialise in all areas of military history, naval and maritime history, aviation, local history, family history, transport, discovery and exploration, collectables and antiques, nostalgia and true crime.

Discount Offer - £5 off all orders when you spend £30 or more using discount code FORWRS5

 

Search the ‘Far East Prisoners of War 1942-46’ collection from Forces War Records today and see who you could to add to your family tree.

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'FREE' Imperial Prisoners of war held in Japan Tutorial and Guide

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During World War II, the Japanese Armed Forces captured nearly 140,000 Allied military personnel (Australia, Canada, Great Britain, India, Netherlands, New Zealand, and the United States) in the Southeast Asia and Pacific areas. They were forced to engage in the hard labour of constructing railways, roads, airfields, etc. to be used by the Japanese Armed Forces in the occupied areas. About 36,000 were transported to the Japanese Mainland to supplement the shortage of the work force, and compelled to work at the coal mines, mines, shipyards, munitions factories, etc. By the time the war was over, a total of more than 30,000 POWs had died from starvation, diseases, and mistreatment both within and outside of the Japanese Mainland.

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