Center Col: Unset
Col Margin: Unset
Col Status: Unset
Mouse over button or menu: Unset
Home Btn Pos X (Left), Y (bottom): Unset
Mouse X, Y: Unset

Recommend this page to a friend:




On a mobile device? Try our mobile site

Unit History: Gloucestershire Regiment

Gloucestershire Regiment The Regiment was raised by Colonel John Gibson in 1694 at Portsmouth, and following the tradition of the time was named 'Gibson's Regiment of Foot' after the Colonel. In 1697 The Regiment sailed to Newfoundland to protect British settlers from the French but arrived too late, and found the colony destroyed and most of the settlers killed. It then went on to serve during The War of Spanish Succession (1701–1714).

In 1751 the Regimental naming system was simplified with each Regiment assigned a ranked number therefore, becoming the 28th Regiment of Foot. The Regiment went on to serve in The Battle of Fontenoy (1745), during the War of the Austrian Succession (1740–48). In 1757 the 28th sailed to Canada during the Seven Years' War to capture the Louisburg fortress in Nova Scotia and then on to attack Quebec. They also served at the Battles of White Plains, Brandywine and Germantown during the American war of Independence (1775–1783).

In 1782 all British Regiments without Royal titles were awarded county titles in order to aid recruitment and the 28th became the 28th (North Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot. It went on to serve during The French Revolutionary War (1792–1802) and fought at the Battle of Alexandria in 1801. At this battle they gained the unique honour of wearing a badge on both the front and back of their head dress, due to the unique action of the infantry when they simultaneously repelled French attacks from the front and the rear. The 28th also served throughout the Peninsula War (1808-1814) including the Battles of Talavera, Albuhera and Vittoria as well as the Hundred Days campaign, the battles of Quatre Bras and Waterloo.

In 1881 The 28th merged with the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot as part of the Childers Reform, to form the Gloucestershire Regiment. The Childers Reforms restructured the British army infantry Regiments into a network of multi-battalion Regiments each having two regular and two militia battalions.

The 61st Regiment of Foot was formed in 1757 when the 2nd battalion of the 3rd Regiment of Foot (later The Buffs) became independent. The Regiment went on to serve in the West Indies capturing Guadeloupe from the French during Seven Years' War (1754–1763). The 61st were garrisoned on Minorca from 1771 at the outbreak of the American war of Independence (1775–1783), subsequently the 61st found itself besieged and forced to surrender at Fort St Philip to a Franco-Spanish force, due to insufficient men after dysentery struck the garrison. The Regiment was awarded a county title in 1782 and became the 61st (South Gloucestershire) Regiment of Foot.

The 61st also served in West Indies from 1794-1796 during French Revolutionary War, attempting to capture of Martinique and St. Lucia from the French. In 1801 it was deployed to Egypt to expel the French and then moved to Italy but was forced to evacuate to Sicily with the deposed King Frederick IV fighting at Battle of Maida. In 1809 it took part in the Peninsular War fighting at the Battles of Talavera, Salamanca, the Siege of Burgos, the Battle of the Pyrenees, Nivelle, Nive, Orthez, and the Battle of Toulouse. It was then on garrison duty for over 30 years in Jamaica, England and Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) before moving to India in 1845 and fighting during the Second Anglo-Sikh War (1848-49) at the Battles of Ramnagar, Saddalupar and Chillianwala and Gujrat. It remained there until 1859 and took part in the Indian Rebellion of 1857 fighting at the Siege of Delhi. The newly formed Gloucestershire Regiment went on to serve in the Second Boer War (1899 to 1902) and two World Wars.

In 1994 as part of the British Army’s ‘Options for Change’ reforms, The Regiment was merged with the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment to form The Royal Gloucestershire, Berkshire and Wiltshire Regiment. Further amalgamations accrued in 2005 when this Regiment merged with the Light Infantry, The Royal Green Jackets and the Devonshire and Dorset Regiment to form The Rifles.

Gloucestershire Regiment during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised a total of 25 battalions and was awarded 72 Battle Honours, 4 Victoria Crosses and lost 8,100 men during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Bordon, Hampshire as part of the 3rd Brigade of the 1st Division.
13.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre where the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, First Battle of Ypres.
During 1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Loos.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Beaurevoir, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Fresnoy-le-Grand.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Tientsin, China at the outbreak of war. Set sail for the UK.
08.11.1914 Landed in Southampton then moved to Winchester and joined the 81st Brigade of the 27th Division.
18.12.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1915
The action of St Eloi, The Second Battle of Ypres.
Nov 1915 Moved to Salonika landing by 12.12.1915 and engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army including; The capture of Karajakois and Yenikoi, the battle of Tumbitza Farm.
03.11.1916 Transferred to the 82nd Brigade of the same Division and continued to engaged in various actions including;
During 1917
The capture of Homondos
During 1918
The final offensive in Salonika, The capture of the Roche Noir Salient, The passage of the Vardar River and pursuit to the Strumica valley.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Bristol and then moved to Abbey Wood, Woolwich.
May 1915 Moved to Gravesend and on to Sittingbourne where it remained until the end of the war.

1/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force and 1/6th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Both stationed at Bristol as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division.
Aug 1916 Moved to Swindon and then on to Essex.
30.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne where the formation became the 144th Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the resistance and engaged in various actions including; The fighting on the Asiago Plateau and The Battle of the Vittoria Veneto.
04.11.1918 The 1/4th ended the war in Austria, Baselge de Pine N.E. of Trent and the 1/6th ended the war Cire, east of Trent.

1/5th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Gloucester as part of the Gloucester and Worcester Brigade of the South Midland Division.
Aug 1914 Moved to the war station on the Isle of Wight and then moved to Swindon and then on to Chelmsford.
29.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne where the formation became the 144th Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the resistance and engaged in various actions including; The fighting on the Asiago Plateau.
11.09.1918 Left the 48th Division and returned to France and joined the 75th Brigade of the 25th Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Pursuit to and Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Preux north of Landrecies.

2/4th (City of Bristol) Battalion Territorial Force and 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Both formed in Bristol and then moved to Northampton to join the 183rd Brigade of the 61st Division.
April 1915 Moved to Chelmsford.
Feb 1916 Moved to Salisbury Plain.
24.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
20.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

2/5th Battalion Territorial Force
Sept 1914 Formed in Gloucester and then moved to Northampton to join the 184th Brigade of the 61st Division.
April 1915 Moved to Chelmsford.
Feb 1916 Moved to Tidworth.
24.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Cambrai Operations.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Maresches south of Valenciennes.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th Battalion Territorial Force
1915 All formed and wintered at Weston-super-Mare.
08.04.1916 Became the 4th 5th and 6th Reserve Battalions as part of the South Midlands Reserve Brigade Territorial Force and moved to Cheltenham.
Mar 1917 Moved to Catterick and then Horton, Northumberland.
Oct 1917 Moved to Seaton Delaval.

7th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the First New Army (K1) and joined the 39th Brigade of the 13th Division and then moved to Tidworth.
Jan 1915 Moved to Basingstoke and then on to Blackdown, Aldershot.
Jun 1915 Mobilised for war and embarked at Avonmouth for Gallipoli.
July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli and engaged in various actions including; The Battle of Sari Bair, The Battle of Russell's Top, The Battle of Hill 60.
Jan 1916 Evacuated to Egypt due to heavy losses from combat, disease and severe weather and defended the Suez Canal.
Feb 1916 Moved to Mesopotamia to defend British interests in the area and engaged in various actions against the Ottoman Empire including;
During 1917
The Battle of Kut al Amara, The capture of the Hai Salient, The capture of Dahra Bend, The passage of the Diyala, capture of Bagdad, The Second and Third Actions of Jabal Hamrin and Tuz Khurmatli.
July 1918 Transferred to the 39th Brigade of the North Persian Force.
31.10.1918 Ended the war in North Persia, Bijar.

8th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Second New Army (K2) and joined the 57th Brigade of the 19th Division and then moved to Perham Down.
Mar 1915 Moved to Tidworth.
18.07.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1915
The Action of Pietre.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First and Second Battles of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, west of Bavai.

9th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Third New Army (K3) and joined the 78th Brigade of the 26th Division and then moved to Cheltenham.
April 1915 Moved to Longbridge Deverill.
21.09.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France.
Nov 1915 Moved to Salonika to strengthen Serbian resistance against the Bulgarian forces and engaged in various actions including;
During 1916
The Battle of Horseshoe Hill.
During 1917
The Battles of Doiran.
04.07.1918 Left the 26th Division and returned to France arriving at Serqueux 17.07.1918 and joined the 198th Brigade of the 66th Division.
22.09.1918 Became a Pioneer Battalion and the Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Cambrai, The Pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, east of Avesnes.

10th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Bristol as part of the Third New Army (K3) and joined the 26th Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
Nov 1914 Moved to Cheltenham and then back to Salisbury Plain April 1915.
08.08.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and joined the 1st Brigade of the 1st Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1915
The Battle of Loos
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
14.02.1918 Disbanded in France and personnel transferred to the 13th Entrenching Battalion.

11th (Reserve) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed as a service battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) at Abbey Wood, Woolwich and joined the 106th Brigade of the 35th Division.
Nov 1914 Moved to Cheltenham.
10.04.1915 Became the 2nd Reserve Battalion and then moved to Belhus Park, Essex.
Sept 1915 Moved to Seaforth as part of the 4th Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 16th Training Reserve Battalion of the 4th Reserve brigade.

12th (Service) Battalion (Bristol)
30.08.1914 Formed by the Citizens’ Recruiting Committee in Bristol.
June 1915 Moved to Wensley Dale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division.
23.06.1915 Taken over by the war office and moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France.
26.12.1915 Transferred to the 95th Brigade of the 5th Division which engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy, The Attack on La Coulotte, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance.
April 1918 Returned to France and once again engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1918
The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the Canal du Nord.
19.10.1918 Disbanded in France.

13th (Service) Battalion (Forest of Dean) (Pioneers)
Dec 1914 Formed at Malvern by Lieutenant Colonel H Webb, MP.
12.07.1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Winchester as a Pioneer Battalion of the 39th Division.
Sept 1915 Moved to Aldershot.
03.03.1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
An attack near Richebourg l'Avoue, The fighting on the Ancre, The Battle of Thiepval Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The actions at the Somme crossings, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Rosieres, The fighting on Wytschaete Ridge, The First and Second Battles of Kemmel, The Battle of the Scherpenberg.
06.05.1918 Reduced to training cadre and transferred to the 66th Division.
20.09.1918 Defending the Lines of Communication in the 197th Brigade.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, near Aumale.

14th (Service) Battalion (West of England)
22.04.1915 Formed as a bantam battalion by the Citizens’ Recruiting Committee in Bristol.
June 1915 Moved to Masham, Yorkshire as part of the 105th Brigade of the 35th Division.
23.06.1915 Taken over by the War Office and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
30.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The fighting for Arrow Head Copse and Maltz Horn Farm, The fighting for Falfemont Farm.
During 1917
The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The fighting in Houthulst Forest, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Tieghem.
11.02.1918 Disbanded in France 12 Officers and 250 men transferred to the 13th Battalion.

15th (Reserve) Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed at Sutton Coldfield as a local reserve battalion, from the depot companies of the 12th and 14th battalions and then moved to Chisledon as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 93rd Training Reserve Battalion.

16th (Reserve) Battalion
Nov 1915 Formed at Chisledon as a local reserve battalion, from the depot company of the 13th battalion as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 94th Training Reserve Battalion.

17th Battalion Territorial Force
01.01.1917 Formed at Walton-on-the-Naze from the 82nd provisional Battalion as part of the 226th Brigade.
Mar 1917 Moved to Clacton where it remained until the end of the war.

18th (Service) Battalion
20.06.1918 Formed at Clacton from the 5th Oxford &Bucks Light Infantry cadre, then moved to Aldershot to join the 49th brigade of the 16th Division.
01.08.1918 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including; The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the War in Belgium, south of Tournai.

Gloucestershire Regiment during WW2

WW2 Battalions of The Gloucestershire Regiment

1st Battalion:
1942 - 1943: The Battalion in Burma and was attached to the 17th Indian Division

2nd Battalion:
08 May 1940: The Battalion was involved in the Battle of France after Germany's invasion of the Low Countries. It took part in the defensive screen protecting the Dunkirk evacuation.
06 June 1944: It took part in the D-Day landings.
September 1944: It was involved in the North-West Europe campaign.
1945-1946: Were part of the 56th Infantry Brigade.

5th Battalion:
1939: The Battalion was part of the 144th Infantry Brigade, 48th (South Midland) Divison.
1940: Was sent to France to join the British Expeditionary Force
31st May 1940: Evacuated from Beaches of Dunkirk. Once returned to the UK, they were taken to Kington, Herefordshire.
14 January 1941: Became part of the 43rd Reconnaissance Regt.

10th Battalion:
1940: The Battalion was formed.
April 1942: Converted to 159 Royal Armoured Corps Regiment.
December 1942: Arrived in India and joined 32nd Indian Armoured Division.
March 1943: Serving in Burma. It was converted back to 10th Battalion (Infantry)and became part of the 72nd Brigade, attached to 36th Division, led by Major General F.W. Festing. (Also known to the troops as "Front Line Frankie") Formation sign of 36th Division were two interlocking circles, one Red and one White and were worn on the uniforms.
April 1944: 'C' Company of the 10th Battalion had taken a Japanese officer sword during 'Ham Bone', action in Burma.
03 August 1944: The town of Myitkyina fell. They were the first Allied formation to actually enter the town, and the only British Division in Theatre operating under American Command, General Joseph Stilwell (also known as Vinegar Joe)
22 November 1944: The Battalion began its assault at Pinwe after the Artillerys bombardment, a long with an air attack on the enemy. It was an extremely fierce fight.
26 November 1944: They were relieved. Pinwe fell two days later.
January 1945: They crossed the Irrawaddy River and came under the command of the Fourteenth Army. They were involved yet again in extremely fierce fighting that led to the final operation that broke the last Japanese resistance in Burma.
December 1945: Disbanded.

Forces Reunited Gallery Images Matching Gloucestershire Regiment

Loading...

Memories of Gloucestershire Regiment

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

Gloucestershire Regiment, 1st Battalion. A Company in 1977

Written by David James McCahill

This profile has been set up to find comrades of my brother David from 1977 to Aug 1978. Looking to find anyone he knew before or during the October 1977 tour of Northern Ireland based near Londonderry. (BallyKelly)

Forces Reunited Forum Posts Involving Gloucestershire Regiment

"...George Thomas was killed in action in Burma on the 1st. May 1942. I have tried, and am still trying to find anyone who may have known him in an effort to discover information about him and his death. His Army number was 4202154 1st Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment. He joined the Royal Welch Fuseliers on 30 May 1940 and was transferred to the Gloucesters 9th. October 1940. He set sail for Burma on the 3rd. January 1941, docked at Bombay 3rd. March 1941 and arrived in Calcutta on the 7..."
Click For More

"... Any information would be greatly appreciated as would contact from anyone who knew him. Private Ivor George Thomas Enlisted Royal Welsh Fusiliers 30 May 1940, transferred to the Gloucester Regiment on 9 October 1940 and to the First Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment 2 January 1941. He left Britain for the far east on 3 January 1941 and was killed in Burma on 1 May 1942.  He has no known grave but his name is on the Taukkyan cemetery memorial near Rangoon which I was lucky enough to visit a..."
Click For More

"HELLO EVERYONE I AM LOKING FOR ANYONE WHO CAN HELP ME FIND OUT ABOUT MY GRANDAD LANCE CORPORAL SAM HILLMAM WHO WAS IN THE GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGIMENT WHICH I THINK WAS PART OF THE 61ST BATT.HE WAS KILLED IN AUGUST 1944 IN RANVILLE FRANCE.I WOULD BE GRATEFUL FOR ANY INFO THAT WOULD HELP ME FIND OUT ANY MORE ABOUT HIM AND HIS LAST DAYS. THANK YOU AND A MERRY CHRISTMAS YOU ALL ASHLEY HILLMAN. A GREATFULL GRANDSON "
Click For More

"...very fondly of him, but also with a great sadness of how circumstances ended up with them losing touch. I would dearly like to find him and put the pals back in touch. His name is Fearnley Gordon and he served his National Service with the 1st Gloucestershire Regiment, based in Kenya during 1955-56. He returned to England on a flight from Kenya which landed at Blackbushe airport during 1956, but i have no exact date. If anyone has any information, photo’s, stories etc about the regiment at..."
Click For More

"missed of 1btn Gloucestershire Regiment 28th/61st come on there has to be a lot of the glosters out there, so come on you slashers [Tiebackground028glos.jpg]"
Click For More

Down arrow Up arrow 1012 people in our Victorian Conflicts records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 4291 people in our Boer War records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 13868 people in our WW1 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 2878 people in our WW2 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 1381 people in our Post WW2 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 336 people in our Forces Reunited records
Filter by Surname:
1

Active From: 1881 - 1994

One moment...

Please wait while we connect with Facebook

Loading