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Unit History: Royal Warwickshire Regiment

Royal Warwickshire Regiment The Regiment originated in the 17th Century in Holland where the English government retained two Regiments of English and Scots troops and one Irish. In 1685 King James II requested their services during the Duke of Monmouth rebellion, when James Scott the 1st Duke of Monmouth (his nephew and the illegitimate son of the Charles II), tried to claim the throne for himself. The Regiment was organised into two units, the 5th and 6th Regiments of Foot and helped to defeat the Monmouth force at the Battle of Sedgemoor. Once Monmouth was defeated the Regiments returned to Holland.

In 1688 Prince William of Orange (King James II’s son-in-law) was invited to take the throne from the unpopular King by the English lords, to become King William III. The 6th Regiment accompanied William III to England and was renamed as "The Dutch Guards". Although James II initially fled to France, he later managed to cultivate support in the Catholic fringes of the ‘Three kingdoms’; Ireland and the Highlands of Scotland. During the rebellion the Regiment help defeat the Jacobite forces at the Battle of the Boyne 1690 and Aughrim 1691 in Ireland.

The Regiment went on to serve in the War of Spanish Succession (1701–1714) fighting during the Battle of Saragossa and Brihuega. During the Jacobite Rising of 1745 the 6th were sent to secure forts between Inverness and Fort William, when Bonnie Prince Charlie (the grandson of James II of England) tried to claim the throne instead of the Hanoverian King George I. In 1776 during the American War of Independence the 6th saw action in New York but were later sent home due to insufficient strength.

In 1782 all British Regiments without Royal titles were awarded county titles in order to aid recruitment therefore the 6th became the 6th (Warwickshire) Regiment of Foot. It went on to serve during the Peninsula War (1808–1814), fighting at the Battles of Roleia, Vimiera, Corunna, Vittoria, Pyrenees, Nivelle, Orthes. The Regiment gained their Royal title in 1832 when it became The Royal (1st) Warwickshire Regiment. The Regiment took part in two campaigns in South Africa known as the Kaffir Wars (7th Kaffir War 1846-47 and 8th Kaffir War 1850-53), protecting Dutch and English settlers from the aggressive native tribes north of Cape Town. The Regiment also took part in the suppressing the India Rebellion of 1857.

In 1881 the Childers Reforms restructured the British army infantry Regiments into a network of multi-battalion Regiments each consisting of; two regular and two militia battalions. The Regiment managed to avoid amalgamation with any other Regiment but the order of precedence title was dropped and became The Royal Warwickshire Regiment. The newly titled Regiment went on to serve during the Second Sudan War (1896-98), fighting at the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum. It also served during the Second Boer War (1889-1902) which was inevitable when the Afrikaners discovered gold on land given them by the British following the First Boer War (1880–1881). The British sought their share of the gold but were also concerned this would make the Boers more powerful and threaten British settlements. The Regiment also served in the Somaliland Operations 1902-04 against the forces of Sayyîd Muhammad `Abd Allâh al-Hasan (called the Mad Mullah by the British) and during the Mohmand Expedition on the North West Frontier in 1908.

In 1963 Queen Elisabeth II approved the Regiment becoming fusiliers and adopted the title of Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers. Due to Government defence reviews, on the 23rd April 1968 the Regiment was merged with the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment) and the Lancashire Fusiliers to form The Royal Regiment of Fusiliers of the Queens Division.

Royal Warwickshire Regiment during WW1

Since 1815 the balance of power in Europe had been maintained by a series of treaties. In 1888 Wilhelm II was crowned ‘German Emperor and King of Prussia’ and moved from a policy of maintaining the status quo to a more aggressive position. He did not renew a treaty with Russia, aligned Germany with the declining Austro-Hungarian Empire and started to build a Navy rivalling that of Britain. These actions greatly concerned Germany’s neighbours, who quickly forged new treaties and alliances in the event of war. On 28th June 1914 Franz Ferdinand the heir to the Austro-Hungarian throne was assassinated by the Bosnian-Serb nationalist group Young Bosnia who wanted pan-Serbian independence. Franz Joseph's the Austro-Hungarian Emperor (with the backing of Germany) responded aggressively, presenting Serbia with an intentionally unacceptable ultimatum, to provoke Serbia into war. Serbia agreed to 8 of the 10 terms and on the 28th July 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Empire declared war on Serbia, producing a cascade effect across Europe. Russia bound by treaty to Serbia declared war with Austro-Hungary, Germany declared war with Russia and France declared war with Germany. Germany’s army crossed into neutral Belgium in order to reach Paris, forcing Britain to declare war with Germany (due to the Treaty of London (1839) whereby Britain agreed to defend Belgium in the event of invasion). By the 4th August 1914 Britain and much of Europe were pulled into a war which would last 1,566 days, cost 8,528,831 lives and 28,938,073 casualties or missing on both sides.

The Regiment raised 30 additional Battalions and was awarded 70 Battle Honours and 5 Victoria Crosses losing 11,610 during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Shorncliffe at the outbreak of war as part of the 10th Brigade of the 4th Division.
22.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1914
The Battle of Le Cateau, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of Messines 1914.
Dec 1914 This Battalion took part in the Christmas Truce of 1914
During 1915
The Second Battle of Ypres.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Advance in Flanders, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France S.E. of Valenciennes.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Malta at the outbreak of war.
19.09.1914 Returned to England and joined the 22nd Brigade of the 7th Division and moved to Lyndhurst.
06.10.1914 Mobilised for war and landed in Zeebrugge and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1914
The First Battle of Ypres
During 1915
The Battle of Neuve Chapelle, The Battle of Aubers, The Battle of Festubert, The second action of Givenchy, The Battle of Loos.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, Operations on the Ancre.
During 1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Arras offensive, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
24.11.1917 Moved to Italy in order to strengthen the Italian Resistance and the Division was involved in various actions including the Battle of Vittoria Veneto.
04.11.1918 Ended the war in Italy west of Udine.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion and 4th (Extra Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Warwick at the outbreak of war.
Aug 1914 Moved to Portsmouth and then the Isle of Wight.
Nov 1917 Moved to Dover and remained there for the rest of the war.

1/5th and 1/6th and 1/7th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 The 1/5th and 1/6th were both stationed at Birmingham while the 1/7th was stationed at Coventry at the outbreak of war. All Battalion were part of the Warwickshire Brigade of the South Midland Division and then moved to Chelmsford.
22.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre were the formation became the 143rd Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy in order to strengthen the Italian Resistance and the Division was involved in various actions including;
During 1918
The fighting on the Asiago Plateau, The Battle of the Vittoria Veneto.
04.11.1918 Ended the war in Austria, N.E. of Trent.

1/8th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Birmingham as part of the Warwickshire Brigade of the South Midland Division and then moved to Chelmsford.
22.03.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre were the formation became the 143rd Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
Nov 1917 Moved to Italy in order to strengthen the Italian Resistance and the Division was involved in various actions including;
During 1918
The fighting on the Asiago Plateau, The Battle of the Vittoria Veneto.
11.9.1918 Left the Division and moved to back to France and joined the 75th Brigade of the 25th Division.
the Battles of the Hindenburg Line, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Pursuit to and Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France near Landrecies.

2/5th and 2/8th Battalion Territorial Force
Oct 1914 Formed at Birmingham as part of the 2/1st Warwickshire Brigade of the 2/1st South Midland Division and then moved to Chelmsford.
Aug 1915 Formation became the 182nd Brigade if the 61st Division and moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed France were the formation became the 143rd Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, .The Battle of Langemarck, The German counter attacks.
20.02.1918 Disbanded in France and personnel transferred to the 2/6th Battalion and 24th Entrenching Battalion.

2/5th and 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force
Oct 1914 The 2/5th Formed at Birmingham and the 2/6th formed at Coventry as part of the 2/1st Warwickshire Brigade of the 2/1st South Midland Division and then moved to Chelmsford.
Aug 1915 Formation became the 182nd Brigade if the 61st Division and moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.05.1916 Mobilised for war and landed France were the formation became the 143rd Brigade of the 48th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Attack at Fromelles.
During 1917
The Operations on the Ancre, The German Retreat to the Hindenburg Line, .The Battle of Langemarck, The German counter attacks.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, south of Valenciennes.

3/5th and 3/6th Battalion Territorial Force
May 1915 Formed in Birmingham and then moved to Weston-super-Mare.
08.04.1916 Became the 5th (Reserve) and 6th (Reserve) Battalions and moved to Ludgershall.
01.09.1916 The 5th absorbed the 6th and joined the South Midland Reserve Brigade of the Territorial Forces.
Mar 1917 Moved to Catterick and on to Northumberland where it remained until the end of the war.

3/7th and 3/8th Battalion Territorial Force
May 1915 Formed in Coventry and Birmingham and then moved to Weston-super-Mare.
08.04.1916 Became the 7th (Reserve) and 8th (Reserve) Battalions and moved to Ludgershall.
01.09.1916 The 7th absorbed the 8th and joined the South Midland Reserve Brigade of the Territorial Forces.
Mar 1917 Moved to Catterick and on to Northumberland where it remained until the end of the war.

9th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed in Warwick as part of the First New Army (K1) and then moved to Salisbury Plain and joined the 39th Brigade of the 13th Division.
Jan 1915 Moved to Basingstoke and then to Blackdown, Aldershot.
24.06.1915 Mobilised for war and embarked for Gallipoli from Avonmouth.
July 1915 Landed at Gallipoli and the Division engaged in various actions including;
The Battle of Sari Bair, The Battle of Russell's Top, The Battle of Hill 60, and The last Turkish attacks at Helles.
Jan 1916 Due to serve losses from combat, disease and harsh weather the Division was evacuated to Mudros and then Egypt.
16.02.1916 Embarked for Basra from Suez arriving 28.02.1916 to defend British interests against Turk forces including;
During 1917
The Battle of Kut al Amara, The capture of the Hai Salient, The capture of Dahra Bend, The passage of the Diyala.
July 1918 The 39th Brigade transferred to the North Persia Force.
31.10.1918 Ended the war in Transcaspia, Krasnovodsk.

10th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed in Warwick as part of the Second New Army (K2) and then moved to Salisbury Plain and joined the 57th Brigade of the 19th Division.
Mar 1915 Moved to Tidworth.
17.7.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1915
The Action of Pietre.
During 1916
The Battle of Albert, The attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of the Ancre Heights, The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, First Battle of Passchendaele, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
During 1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle of Kemmel Ridge, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre and the passage of the Grand Honelle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, west of Bavai.

11th (Service) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed in Warwick as part of the Third New Army (K3) and then moved to Salisbury Plain and joined the Army Troops of the 24th Division.
April 1915 Joined the 112th Brigade of the 37th Division.
30.7.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
During 1916
The Battle of the Ancre.
During 1917
The First and Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Battle of Pilkem Ridge, The Battle of the Menin Road Ridge, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The First Battle of Passchendaele.
07.02.1918 Disbanded in France, Wardrecques.

12th (Service) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed in Parkhurst, Isle of Wight as a service Battalion for the Fourth New Army (K4) and joined the 97th Brigade of the 32nd Division then moved to Newport.
10.04.1915 Became a 2nd Reserve Battalion.
May 1915 Moved to Wool, Dorset and joined the 8th Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalions.

13th (Service) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed in Golden Hill, Isle of Wight as a service Battalion for the Fourth New Army (K4) and joined the 97th Brigade of the 32nd Division then moved to Totland Bay.
10.04.1915 Became a 2nd Reserve Battalion.
May 1915 Moved to Swanage and joined the 8th Reserve Brigade and the moved to Blandford.
01.09.1916 Became the 33rd Training Reserve Battalions and moved to Wool, Dorset.

14th (Service) Battalion (1st Birmingham)
Sept 1914 Formed in Birmingham by the Lord Mayor and a local Committee then moved to Sutton Coalfield.
25.06.1915 Moved to Wensley Dale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and transferred to the 13th Brigade of the 5th Division and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy, The Attack on La Coulotte, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
29.11-06.12.1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian Resistance.
01-06.04.1918 Returned to France and became a Pioneer Battalion of the 5th Division which was involved in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France, Pont-sur-Sambre.

15th (Service) Battalion (2nd Birmingham)
Sept 1914 Formed in Birmingham by the Lord Mayor and a local Committee then moved to Sutton Coalfield.
June 1915 Moved to Wensley Dale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and transferred to the 13th Brigade of the 5th Division and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy, The Attack on La Coulotte, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
29.11-06.12.1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian Resistance.
01-06.04.1918 Returned to France and the Division was involved in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the Canal du Nord.
06.10.1918 Disbanded in France near Ytres and personnel moved to the 14th and 16th Battalions.

16th (Service) Battalion (3rd Birmingham)
Sept 1914 Formed in Birmingham by the Lord Mayor and a local Committee then moved to Moseley and then Malvern.
June 1915 Moved to Wensley Dale to join the 95th Brigade of the 32nd Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and transferred to the 15th Brigade of the 5th Division and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
During 1916
The Attacks on High Wood, The Battle of Guillemont, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
During 1917
The Battle of Vimy, The Attack on La Coulotte, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
13.12.1917 Moved to Italy to strengthen the Italian Resistance.
08.04.1918 Returned to France and the Division was involved in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Drocourt-Queant, The Battle of the Epehy, The Battle of the Canal du Nord.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in France near Le Quesnoy.

17th (Reserve) Battalion
June 1915 Formed at Sutton Coldfield from the depot Companies of the 14th 15th and 16th Battalions.
Nov 1915 Moved to Chisledon as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
01.09.1916 Became the 92nd Training Reserve Battalion of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.

18th Battalion Territorial Battalion
01.01.1917 Formed from the 81st Provisional Battalion at Bath in the 215th Brigade of the 72nd Division.
Jan 1917 Moved to Bedford and then Ipswich.
19.01.1918 Disbanded.

1st Garrison Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed in Weymouth and moved to Egypt where it remained throughout the war.

51st (Garrison) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Ipswich from the 262nd Graduated Battalion (previously the 93rd Training Reserve Battalion formerly the 15th Gloucester), as part of the 216th Brigade of the 72nd Division.
Jan 1918 Transferred to the 205th Brigade of the 68th Division and moved to Lowestoft.
June 1918 Moved to Henham Park, Southwold.

52nd (Garrison) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Chelmsford from the 274th Graduated Battalion (previously the 94th Training Reserve Battalion formerly the 16th Gloucester), as part of the 220th Brigade of the 73rd Division.
Jan 1918 Transferred to the 205th Brigade of the 68th Division and moved to Lowestoft.
June 1918 Moved to Henham Park, Southwold.

53rd (Young Soldier) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Chisledon from the 95th Young Soldier Battalion (previously the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry), as part of the 22nd Reserve Brigade.
31.10.1917 Transferred to the 8th Reserve Brigade and moved to Larkhill.

Royal Warwickshire Regiment during WW2

WW2 Battalions of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment

2 nd Battalion
The Battalion was part of the formation of 48th (South Midland) Division (Maj-Gen A.F.A.N Thorne), 144thInfantry Brigade. They were part of the British Expeditionary Force that fought in Belgium and France.
1940: they took part in the action at Dunkirk by holding the enemy back on the Comines Canal, the Escaut, allowing soldiers to be evacuated from the beach (known as Operation Dynamo) until they were overrun by advancing German forces. The troops at this point surrendered. After their surrender, soldiers from the 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the Cheshire Regiment, and Royal Artillery as well as French soldiers in charge of a military depot were taken to a barn near Wormhoudt and Esquelbecq on 28 May 1940. They were then massacred by the 1st SS Div’ Leibstandarte apart from 15 men who were later found by a regular German Army unit who treated their wounds before they were sent to PoW camp
1944: the 2nd Battalion were part of 3rd Infantry Division 185 Infantry Brigade. They were involved in the D-Day landings, the Sword Beach conflict and were joined shortly afterwards by the 1/7th battalion.

5th Battalion
The Battalion was part of the formation of 48th (South Midland) Division (Maj-Gen A.F.A.N Thorne), 143rd Infantry Brigade.

6th Battalion
1939-40: the Battalion were with the British Expeditionary Force in Belgium and France, They also took part in the action at Dunkirk by holding the enemy back at the Escaut, Wormhoudt, where some suffered the Wormhoudt massacre, and on the Ypres-Comines Canal. (See 2nd 1/7th and 8th Battalions)
6 June 1944: D Day men of the Battalion landed and involved with the first assault on the Normandy beaches and fought from Caen and the break out from Normandy to the Rhine crossing. They took part in the capture of Bremen, the last major action of the European war.
1942-1945: Battalion fought in Burma and took part in the capture of Rangoon.

1/7 th Battalion
The Battalion was part of the formation of 48th (South Midland) Division (Maj-Gen A.F.A.N Thorne), 143rd Infantry Brigade (B.E.F)
1940: they fought in Belgium and France. They took part in the action at Dunkirk by holding the enemy back on the Comines Canal, the Escaut Canal and at Wormhoudt where some were massacred by the SS Leibstandarte. (see 2nd 6th and 8th Battalion)
June 1944: Battalion were part of the D-Day landings and shortly afterwards joined 2nd Battalion
1st July 1944: Battalion joined 59th Division (Staffordshire) DC: Major-General L. O. Lyne 197th Brigade, Brigadier J. Lingham in Normandy

8 th Battalion
1940: they fought in Belgium and France. They took part in the action at Dunkirk by holding the enemy back on the Comines Canal, the Escaut Canal and at Wormhoudt where some were massacred by the SS Leibstandarte. (see 2nd 6th and 1/7th Battalion)

12 th Battalion
One of un-brigaded Infantry Battalions (Companies and even platoon detachments of these battalions were stationed at various bases in the rear areas)

Forces Reunited Gallery Images Matching Royal Warwickshire Regiment

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Memories of Royal Warwickshire Regiment

(Memories written by members of Forces Reunited)

Royal Warwickshire Regiment, in 1960

Written by Geoff Bolstridge

Being a member of the guard of honour at Kai Tak airport to meet Montgomery when he visited the battalion in 1960. All the guard were selected from HQ company not the Rifle company’s. I suppose it was an honour although it didn’t seem like it at the time. We practised on the Troopship (Dunera) taking us from Aden to Hong Kong. Drill in pumps and on a surface that kept moving.

Forces Reunited Forum Posts Involving Royal Warwickshire Regiment

"I am trying to trace my birth father. He was serving with the Royal Warwickshire Regiment when I was born in 1945. My birth certificate states him as Private George Frederick Lavell Service No. 14434724. At that time he was living in Stour street in Birmingham. If anybody knows of his wherabouts I would be grateful if you would contact me. Kind Regards Ken "
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"Does anyone remember Francis John Harvey? He was a Lance Corporal Royal Warwickshire Regiment in 1935 but I don’t know what happened to him after that. He was married to Annie Beatrice (nee Clarke). Thanks "
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"Dad’s service number was 5115812 and he joined the Royal Warwickshire Regiment in Birmingham 1940. His Registration number was Q C A M.89.3 Territorial Army. He was then sent to BTNI Vehicle maintainence school in Ireland to gain his Group D class 2 licence. Ha was sent to Northern France on the 20/7/44 (I believe he landed in Arromanche) and was heading towards Caen, when he was injured on the 13th August 1944 "
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"...faced the charge of a statutory felony for which the Act provided. The Times, Monday, August 04, 1919 The Act was repealed in Britain in 1973. A lot of this was caused by bad feeling left over from the 1911 transport strike when troops of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment together with numerous officers from the Leeds and Birmingham Police hidden inside St. Georges’ Hall baton charged the crowd as the riot act was read with indiscriminate use of their batons mainly by the Birmingham Police...."
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"...because of the heavy losses. A lack of records has made it difficult to establish who may be buried in the mass graves. But the British regiments involved were the Gloucestershire Regiment, the Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire Light Infantry, the Royal Warwickshire Regiment, the Worcestershire Regiment, and the Machine Gun Corps. Veterans Minister Kevan Jones said: "By the end of the project in 2010 all the bodies will be permanently laid to rest in individual graves at a new Commonwealth War..."
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Active From: 1782 - 1963

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