Center Col: Unset
Col Margin: Unset
Col Status: Unset
Mouse over button or menu: Unset
Home Btn Pos X (Left), Y (bottom): Unset
Mouse X, Y: Unset

Recommend this page to a friend:




On a mobile device? Try our mobile site

Unit History: Northumberland Fusiliers

Northumberland Fusiliers The Regiment was first formed by Lord Clare in 1674 as part of a force of 5 British Regiments in the Dutch Army serving William of Orange in his campaigns against the French. In 1685 King James II recalled his troops from Holland during the Monmouth Rebellion, when James Scott the 1st Duke of Monmouth (and the King’s nephew) unsuccessfully attempted to overthrow the unpopular King. The returning Regiments were given seniority based on their landing on English soil; therefore the Regiment became the 5th Regiment of Foot. The Monmouth Rebellion was swiftly put down at the Battle of Sedgemoor and the 5th returned to Holland until 1689, when it accompanied the Prince of Orange on his landing in England to claim the throne as King William III, as James the II abdicated.

During The Rising of 1689–92 James II attempted to regain the throne by raising a Jacobite Army from the Scottish clans. The 5th were part of a force which crushed the rebellion at the Battle of the Boyne (1690). In 1692 the Regiment went on to serve during the Nine Years War (1688–97) against the French fighting to recapture Namur, Belgium. It also served during the War of the Spanish Succession (1701–1714) fighting at Campo Maior (1709) and in action on the River Caia. During the Anglo-Spanish War of 1727 the Regiment withheld a siege by the Spanish for four months at Gibraltar and during the Seven Years’ War (1754–1763) fought at the Battle of Warburg (1760), the Battle of Kirch Denkern (1761) and the Battle of Wilhelmsthal (1762).

In 1774 the Regiment went on to serve during the American War of Independence (1775–1783) initially arriving in Boston to control the civil unrest in the area. It went on to fight the Battle of Bunker Hill, the Battle of Long Island, the Battle of White Plans and the capture of Fort Washington, Fort Lee and New Jersey, and the Battle of Brandywine Creek.

In 1778 The Regiment moved to the West Indies engaging French troops at Saint Lucia. 400 French soldiers were killed and 1,100 wounded with only 10 British killed and 130 wounded. The French abandoned the Island and the Regiment took the white plumes worn by French soldiers in their caps, which is the basis for the current red and white hackle worn. The 5th remained in the West Indies for 2 years and then moved to Ireland were it remained until 1783.

In 1782 all British Regiments without a Royal title were given county designations in order to improve recruitment from that area. The 5th became the 5th (Northumberland) Regiment of Foot due to the Regiment’s colonel Hugh Percy, 1st Duke of Northumberland and then went on to fight in the Peninsular War. In 1836 the 5th became a Fusilier Regiment redesignated as the 5th (Northumberland Fusiliers) Regiment of Foot and went on to serve in the Indian Rebellion of 1857 and the Second Anglo-Afghan War.

In 1881 the Regiment was one of the few that avoided amalgamation as part of the Childers Reforms, the number of line was dropped and the Regiment became the Northumberland Fusiliers and went on to serve during the Second Boer War and two World Wars. In 1935 as part of George V’s silver jubilee celebrations the Regiment was granted a Royal title along with three other Regiments and became the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers.

In 1968 the Regiment was amalgamated with The Royal Warwickshire Fusiliers, The Royal Fusiliers (City of London Regiment), and The Lancashire Fusiliers to become the Royal Regiment of Fusiliers.

Northumberland Fusiliers during WW1

The Regiment raised 52 battalions with 29 of them serving overseas. It was awarded 67 Battle Honours and 5 Victoria Crosses, losing 16,000 men during the course of the war.

1st Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Portsmouth As part of the 9th Brigade of the 3rd Division.
14.08.1914 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre as part of the British Expeditionary Force (B.E.F.) and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1914
The Battle of Mons and the subsequent retreat, The Battle of Le Cateau, The Battle of the Marne, The Battle of the Aisne, The Battles of La Bassee and Messines 1914, First Battle of Ypres.
1915
Winter Operations 1914-15, The First Attack on Bellewaarde, The Actions of Hooge, The Second Attack on Bellewaarde.
1916
The Actions of the Bluff and St Eloi Craters, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of Delville Wood, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Cambrai 1917.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras 1918, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of Bethune, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at La Longueville east of Bavai, Belgium.

2nd Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Sabathu, India.
20.11.1914 Embarked for England from Karachi arriving at Plymouth 22.12.1914 moved to Winchester and joined the 84th Brigade of the 28th Division.
18.01.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Second Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Loos.
24.10.1915 Embarked for Alexandria from Marseilles.
24.11.1915 Deployed to Salonika and engaged in various actions against the Bulgarian Army including;
1916
The occupation of Mazirko, The capture of Barakli Jum'a.
1917
The capture of Ferdie and Essex Trenches (near Barakli Jum'a), The capture of Barakli and Kumli.
June 1918 Left 28th Division and returned to France via Itea and Taranto.
16.07.1918 Transferred to the 150th Brigade of the 50th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of the Beaurevoir Line, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Dourlers north of Avesnes, France.

3rd (Reserve) Battalion
04.08.1914 Stationed at Newcastle-on-Tyne then moved to the East Boldon where it remained.

1/4th 1/5th & 1/6th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 1/4th stationed at Hexham, the 1/5th stationed at Walker, Newcastle-on-Tyne and the 1/6th stationed at Northumberland Road, Newcastle-on-Tyne, both part of the Northumberland Brigade of the Northumbrian Division, on Tyne Defences.
April 1915 Mobilised for war and Landed in France where the formation became 149th Brigade of the 50th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of St Julien, The Battle of Frezenburg Ridge, The Battle of Bellewaarde Ridge.
1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Wancourt Ridge, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Rosieres, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of the Aisne.
15.07.1918 Reduced to cadre and moved to defend Lines of Communication in the Dieppe area.
16.08.1918 Transferred to the 118th Brigade of the 39th Division which supervised American Troop training.
10.11.1918 All Disbanded.

1/7th Battalion Territorial Force
04.08.1914 Stationed at Alnwick as part of the Northumberland Brigade of the Northumbrian Division, on Tyne Defences.
April 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France where the formation became 149th Brigade of the 50th Division and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of St Julien, The Battle of Frezenburg Ridge, The Battle of Bellewaarde Ridge.
1916
The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of the Transloy Ridges.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Wancourt Ridge, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Actions at the Somme Crossings, The Battle of Rosieres, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Hazebrouck, The Battle of the Aisne.
12.02.1918 Transferred to the 42nd Division as a Pioneer Battalion and then Division engaged in various actions;
1918
The Battle of Bapaume, The First Battle of Arras, The Battle of the Ancre, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Hautmont, France.

2/4th 2/5th & 2/6th Battalion Territorial Force
Nov 1914 The 2/4th & 2/5th Formed at Blythe.
28.12.1914 The 2/6th Formed at Newcastle.
Jan 1915 All moved to Swalwell Camp and joined the 188th Brigade of the 63rd Division.
July 1916 The Division broken up and brigade remained at York.
Nov 1916 Moved to Clevedon and transferred to the 217th Brigade of the 72nd Division.
Jan 1917 Moved to Northampton.
May 1917 The Moved to Ipswich.
Dec 1917 The 2/5th & 2/6th disbanded.
May 1918 The 2/4th disbanded.

2/7th Battalion Territorial Force
26.09.1914 Formed at Alnwick.
Jan 1915 Moved to Swalwell Camp near Newcastle, joined the 188th Brigade of the63rd Division.
Nov 1915 Brigade moved to York.
Jan 1917 Battalion moved to Egypt as a garrison battalion.

3/4th 3/5th 3/6th & 3/7th Battalion Territorial Force
June 1915 The 3/4th formed at Hexham, the 3/5th & 3/6th formed at Newcastle and the 3/7th formed at Alnwick.
08.04.1916 Moved to Catterick and became Reserve battalions.
01.09.1916 Moved to Redcar the 3/4th absorbed the 3/5th 3/6th & 3/7th.
Mar 1917 Moved to Atwick, Hornsea.
Early 1918 Moved to South Dalton and then to Rowlston, Hornsea where it remained in the Northumbrian Reserve Infantry Brigade Territorial Force.

8th (Service) Battalion
Aug 1914 Formed at Newcastle as part of the First New Army (K1), moved to Grantham and joined the 34th Brigade of the 11th Division.
April 1915 Moved to Witley, Surrey.
July 1915 Moved to the Mediterranean.
07.08.1915 Landed in Gallipoli and engaged in various actions against the Turkish Army including;
The landing near Lala Baba at Suvla Bay, The Battle of Sari Bair.
Jan 1916 Evacuated from Gallipoli to Egypt due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather and then moved to defend the Suez Canal.
July 1916 Deployed back France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The capture of the Wundt-Werk, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Thiepval.
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Langemarck, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Battle of Poelcapelle.
1918
The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Quant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The pursuit to the Selle, The Battle of the Sambre.
11.11.1918 Ended the war Grosse Naie S.W. of Aulnois, France.

9th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Newcastle as part of the Second New Army (K2), moved to Wareham area and joined the 52nd Brigade of the 17th Division.
Dec 1914 Moved to Wimborne, Dorset.
Mar 1915 Moved to Wool, Dorset then Hursley, Hampshire.
July 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
Holding front lines in southern area of Ypres salient.
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Delville Wood.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Capture of Roeux.
03.08.1917 Transferred to the 104th Brigade of the 34th Division.
25.09.1917 Absorbed the 2/1st Northumberland Yeomanry and became the 9th (Northumberland Hussars Yeomanry) Battalion.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
26.05.1918 Transferred to the 183rd Brigade of the 61st Division.
The Battle of the Selle, The Battle of Valenciennes.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Bermerain south of Valenciennes, France.

10th & 11th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Newcastle as part of the Third New Army (K3) then moved to Bullswater near Frensham to join the 68th Brigade of the 23rd Division.
Dec 1914 Moved to North Camp, Aldershot.
Feb 1915 Moved to Ashford, Kent and then Bramshott, Hampshire.
Aug 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
Trench familiarisation as part of the 20th (Light) and 27th Divisions and then took control of the front line at Ferme Grande Flamengrie to the Armentieres-Wez Macquart road and at Bois Grenier.
1916
The German Attack on Vimy Ridge, The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy, The capture of Le Sars.
1917
The Battle of Messines, The Battle of the Menin Road, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The First Battle of Passchendaele, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
Nov 1917 Deployed to Italy to strengthen the Italian resistance;
1918
The fighting on the Asiago Plateau, The Battle of Vittorio Veneto, including the passage of the Piave and the battle of Monticano.
04.11.1918 Ended the war in Porcia, Italy.

12th & 13th (Service) Battalion
Sept 1914 Formed at Newcastle as part of the Third New Army (K3) then moved to Halton Park and joined the 62nd Brigade of the 21st Division, then moved to Aylesbury area.
May 1915 Moved to back to Halton Park and then Witley, Surrey.
Sept 1915 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos (the Division suffered over 3,800 casualties and took the rest of the year to rebuild)
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The flanking operations around Bullecourt, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Second Battle of Passchendaele, The Cambrai Operations.
10.08.1917 Amalgamated with the 13th Battalion forming the 12/13th Battalion.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Second Battle of Kemmel, The Battle of the Aisne 1918, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Berlaimont, France.

14th (Service) Battalion (Pioneers)
Sept 1914 Formed in Newcastle as part of the Third New Army (K3) joining the 21st Division at Halton Park and Aylesbury area.
Jan 1915 Became Pioneer Battalion and moved to Witley, Surrey.
Sept 1915 Mobilised for war and Landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1915
The Battle of Loos (the Division suffered over 3,800 casualties and took the rest of the year to rebuild)
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette, The Battle of Morval, The Battle of Le Transloy.
1917
The German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Third Battle of the Scarpe, The flanking operations around Bullecourt, The Battle of Polygon Wood, The Battle of Broodseinde, The Second Battle of Passchendaele, The Cambrai Operations.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Messines, The Second Battle of Kemmel, The Battle of the Aisne 1918, The Battle of Albert, The Second Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Epehy, The Battle of the St Quentin Canal, The Battle of Cambrai 1918, The Battle of the Selle.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Berlaimont, France.

15th (Reserve) Battalion
Oct 1914 Formed at Darlington as a service battalion of the Fourth New Army (K4) as part of the 89th Brigade of the 30th Division.
10.04.1915 Became a 2nd reserve battalion and the Brigade became the 1st Reserve Brigade.
Nov 1915 Moved to Rugeley, Cannock Chase.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalions of the 1st Reserve Brigade.

16th (Service) Battalion (Newcastle)
Sept 1914 Formed by Newcastle & Gateshead Chamber of Commerce at Newcastle.
Nov 1914 Moved to Alnwick then Cramlington, Northumberland.
Jun 1915 Moved to Catterick and join the 96th Brigade of the 32nd Division then moved to Codford St. Mary.
22.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Boulogne and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of the Ancre.
1917
Operations on the Ancre, The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line.
07.02.1918 Disbanded at Elverdinghe, remaining personnel transferred to the Territorial Forces Battalions of the 50th Division.

17th (Service) Battalion (N.E.R., Pioneers)
Sept 1914 Formed at Hull by the North Eastern Railway.
11.01.1915 Became a Pioneer Battalion.
June 1915 Moved to Catterick and joined the 32nd Division then moved to Codford St. Mary.
01.09.1915 Taken over by the War Office.
21.11.1915 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin, The Battle of the Ancre.
19.10.1916 Transferred to G.H.Q. Railway Construction Troops.
02.09.1917 Rejoined the 32nd Division at Ghyvelde.
15.11.1917 Transferred to G.H.Q. Railway Construction again.
31.05.1918 Transferred to 52nd Division as Pioneer Battalion.
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of the Drocourt-Queant Line, The Battle of the Canal du Nord, The Final Advance in Artois.
11.11.1918 Ended the war in Sirault N.W. of Mons, Belgium.

18th (Service) Battalion (1st Tyneside Pioneers)
14.10.1914 Formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City.
21.12.1914 Moved to Rothbury.
08.02.1915 Became a Pioneer battalion and then moved to Cramlington, then Kirkby Malzeard and joined the 34th Division as a Pioneer Battalion.
30.08.1915 Moved to Windmill Hill, Salisbury Plain and then Sutton Veny.
08.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt, The Third Battles of Ypres.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
18.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to 116th Brigade of the 39th Division.
29.07.1918 Transferred to the 118th Brigade.
16.08.1918 Transferred to the 66th Division.
20.09.1918 Transferred to the 197th Brigade to defend the Lines of Communication.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Haudricourt south of Aumale, France.

19th (Service) Battalion (2nd Tyneside Pioneers)
16.11.1914 Formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City.
13.01.1915 Moved to Morpeth and then Cramlington.
08.02.1915 Became a Pioneer Battalion then moved to Masham and joined the 35th Division.
Aug 1915 Taken over by the War Office and moved to Perham Down, Salisbury Plain.
29.01.1916 Mobilised for war and landed at Havre.
1916
The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The fighting for Arrow Head Copse and Maltz Horn Farm, The fighting for Falfemont Farm.
1917
The pursuit of the German retreat to the Hindenburg Line, The fighting in Houthulst Forest, The Second Battle of Passchendaele.
1918
The First Battle of Bapaume, The Battle of Ypres, The Battle of Courtrai, The action of Tieghem.
11.11.1918 Ended the war at Waermaerde east of Courtrai, Belgium.

20th (Service) Battalion (1st Tyneside Scottish) & 21st (Service) Battalion (2nd Tyneside Scottish)
14.10.1914 The 20th formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City and the 21st formed on 26.09.1914.
Mar 1915 Moved to Alnwick and joined the 102nd Brigade of the 34th Division.
Aug 1915 Moved to Salisbury Plain.
15.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office
Jan 1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt, The Third Battles of Ypres.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
03.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

22nd (Service) Battalion (3rd Tyneside Scottish) & 23rd (Service) Battalion (4th Tyneside Scottish)
Nov 1914 Both formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City.
Mar 1915 Alnwick and joined the 102nd Brigade of the 34th Division and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
15.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office.
Jan 1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt, The Third Battles of Ypres.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
17.05.1918 Both reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 The 23rd transferred to the 116th Brigade of the 39th Division.
18.06.1918 The 22nd returned to England with the 16th Division and absorbed the new 38th Battalion at Margate and rejoined the 48th Brigade of the 16th Division at Aldershot.
16.08.1918 The 23rd transferred to the 66th Division.
July 1918 The 22nd returned to France and once again engaged in various actions including;
The Final Advance in Artois.
20.09.1918 The 23rd transferred to the 197th Brigade to defend the Lines of Communication.
11.11.1918 The 23rd ended the war near Aumale, France and the 22nd ended the war south of Tournai, Belgium.

24th (Service) Battalion (1st Tyneside Irish) & 27th (Service) Battalion (4th Tyneside Irish)
14.11.1914 The 24th formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City and the 27th in Jan 1915.
Mar 1915 Both moved to Woolsington and joined the 103rd Brigade of the 34th Division.
27.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
Jan 1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt, The Third Battles of Ypres.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
10.08.1917 Amalgamated with the 27th Battalion forming 24/27th Battalion.
26.02.1918 Disbanded in France.

25th (Service) Battalion (2nd Tyneside Irish) & 26th (Service) Battalion (3rd Tyneside Irish)
Nov 1914 Both formed at Newcastle by the Lord Mayor & the City.
Mar 1915 Moved to Woolsington and joined the 103rd Brigade of the 34th Division.
27.08.1915 Taken over by the War Office and then moved to Salisbury Plain.
Jan 1916 Mobilised for war and landed in France and engaged in various actions on the Western front including;
1916
The Battle of Albert, The Battle of Bazentin Ridge, The Battle of Pozieres Ridge, The Battle of Flers-Courcelette.
1917
The First Battle of the Scarpe, The Second Battle of the Scarpe, The Battle of Arleux, The fighting at Hargicourt, The Third Battles of Ypres.
1918
The Battle of St Quentin, The Battle of Estaires, The Battle of Bailleul, The First Battle for Kemmel Ridge.
03.02.1918 The 26th disbanded in France.
03.02.1918 The 25th transferred to the 102nd Brigade of the 34th Division.
16.05.1918 Reduced to cadre.
17.06.1918 Transferred to the 116th Brigade of the 39th Division.
16.08.1918 Transferred to the 66th Division.
20.09.1918 Transferred to the 197th Brigade to defend the Lines of Communication.
11.11.1918 Ended the war near Aumale, France.

28th (Reserve) Battalion
July 1915 Formed form the depot companies of the 18th & 19th Battalions at Cramlington, as a local reserve battalion.
Nov 1915 Moved to Ripon, Yorkshire and joined the 19th Reserve Brigade and then to Harrogate.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalion of the 19th Reserve Brigade.

29th (Reserve) Battalion (Tyneside Scottish)
July 1915 Formed form the depot companies of the 20th & 23rd Battalions at Alnwick, Northumberland as a local reserve battalion.
Jan 1916 Moved to Barnard’s Castle and joined the 20th Reserve Brigade and then moved to Hornsea, Yorkshire.
01.09.1916 Became the 84th Training Reserve Battalion of the 20th Reserve Brigade.

30th (Reserve) Battalion (Tyneside Irish)
July 1915 Formed form the depot companies of the 24th & 27th Battalions at Woolsington, as a local reserve battalion.
Nov 1915 Moved to Richmond, Yorkshire and joined the 29th Reserve Brigade and then moved to Catterick.
April 1916 Moved to Hornsea, Yorkshire.
01.09.1916 Became the 85th Training Reserve Battalion in the 20th Reserve Brigade.

31st (Reserve) Battalion
Nov 1915 Formed form the depot companies of the 16th Battalion at Catterick, as a local reserve battalion in the 20th Reserve Brigade.
April 1916 Moved to Hornsea, Yorkshire.
01.09.1916 Became the 86th Training Reserve Battalion in the 20th Reserve Brigade.

32nd (Reserve) Battalion
Nov 1915 Formed form the depot companies of the 17th Battalion at Catterick, as a local reserve battalion in the 19th Reserve Brigade.
Dec 1915 Moved to Harrogate.
June 1916 Moved to Usworth, Washington.
01.09.1916 Became the 80th Training Reserve Battalion in the 19th Reserve Brigade.

33rd (Reserve) Battalion (Tyneside Scottish)
June 1916 Formed form the 29th (Reserve) Battalion at Hornsea, Yorkshire as a local reserve battalion.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalion of the 20th Reserve Brigade.

34th (Reserve) Battalion (Tyneside Irish)
June 1916 Formed form the 30th (Reserve) Battalion at Hornsea, Yorkshire as a local reserve battalion.
01.09.1916 Absorbed into the Training Reserve Battalion of the 20th Reserve Brigade.

35th Battalion Territorial Forces
01.01.1917 Formed at Herne Bay from the 21st Provisional Battalion as part of the 227th Brigade.
Early 1918 Moved to Westleton, Suffolk where it remained.

35th Battalion Territorial Forces
01.01.1917 Formed at St. Osyth, Essex from the 22nd Provisional Battalion as part of the 222nd Brigade.
Mar 1917 Moved to Ramsgate and then Margate, Kent.
27.04.1918 Became a Garrison Guard Battalion.
May 1918 Deployed to France and joined the 178th Brigade of the 59th Division.
July 1918 Title ‘Garrison Guard’ dropped and the Division engaged in various actions on the Western Front including;
The Battle of Albert, The general final advance in Artois and Flanders.
11.11.1918 Ended the war N.E. of Tournai, Belgium.

37th (Home Service) Battalion
27.04.1918 Formed at Margate and replaced the 36th Battalion in the 222nd Brigade.

1st Garrison Battalion
Aug 1915 Formed and went to Malta.

2nd Garrison Battalion
Oct 1915 Formed at Newcastle and went to India in Feb 1916.

3rd (Home Service) Garrison Battalion
Mar 1916 Formed at Sunderland.
1917 In Ireland and in Belfast 1918.

51st (Graduated) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Welbeck from the 238th Graduated Battalion (formerly the new 4th Training Reserve Battalion) as part of the 206th Brigade of the 69th Division.
Early 1918 Moved to Middlesbrough and then Guisborough, Yorkshire where it remained.

52nd (Graduated) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Canterbury from the 276th Graduated Battalion (formerly the new 3rd Training Reserve Battalion) as part of the 200th Brigade of the 67th Division.
05.03.1918 Moved to Barnards Castle and then Guisborough, Yorkshire where it remained.

53rd (Young Soldier) Battalion
27.10.1917 Formed at Rugeley, Cannock Chase from the 5th Young Soldier Battalion (formerly 10th Leicesters) as part of the 1st Reserve Brigade.
Oct 1918 Moved to Clipstone, Nottinghamshire.

Northumberland Fusiliers during WW2

Throughout the Second World War The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers were involved in action including: Defence of Escaut, Arras Counter Attack, St. Omer-La Bassée, Dunkirk 1940, Odon, Caen, Cagny, Falaise, Nederrijn, Rhineland, North-West Europe 1940 '44-45, Sidi Barrani, Defence of Tobruk, Tobruk 1941, Belhamed, Cauldron, Ruweisat Ridge, El Alamein, Advance on Tripoli, Medenine, North Africa 1940-43, Salerno, Volturno Crossing, Monte Camino, Garigliano Crossing, Cassino II, Italy 1943-45, Singapore Island. They were awarded twenty-nine battle honours.

WW2 Battalions of the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers
1st RNF Battalion:
The Battalion at the outbreak of War were already in the Middle East. They were part of the Desert Rats as machine gunners and saw action at Tobruk, where they were attached to the 18th Brigade of the 7th Australian Division. In September 1943 they entered Italy. In 1945 returned to the Middle East.

2nd RNF Battalion:
The Battalion was the first of the regiment to go abroad as part of the BEF. On the 1st October 1939 they went to France and in May/June 1940 were evacuated from Dunkirk and became part of the 4 Inf Div. Home forces. In July 1943 they were sent to Tunisia and in March 1944 to Italy and then in January 1945 they were sent to Greece.

9th RNF Battalion:
The Battalionn was formed as a duplicate of the 7th Battalion in early 1939. They saw action in France with the BEF, upon returning to Britain they were reequipped with Vickers machine guns moved to Crown Hill Barracks in Plymouth engaging in the defense of the Devon coast. In August the Battalion 1940 the 9th became part of the 18th Division and moved to Norfolk to defend the coast line from Wells to Great Yarmouth. The Battalion moved to the Scottish Borders in January 1941 for intensive training, with the HQ was at Bowhill House. In June 1941 they transferred to Cheshire, Desert Kit was issued and the vehicles repainted in desert sand colours. Following embarkation leave, on the 24th October the 9th Btn. sailed for Halifax aboard the 'Warwick Castle' from Liverpool. Arriving in Halifax they re-embarked on the American troopship the 'USS Orizaba' After a long hot journey via the Port of Spain in Trinidad and Capetown they arrived in Bombay for training before setting sail again for Singapore in late January 1942 to join the 11th Indian Division.

Forces Reunited Gallery Images Matching Northumberland Fusiliers

Loading...

Forces Reunited Forum Posts Involving Northumberland Fusiliers

"I am posting this on behalf of my husband, the eldest son of Joseph (Barry) Noble who was born in 1900. Barry Noble enlisted in the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers in 1922. Appointed Lance Corporal 1924, promoted Corporal 1926. Lance Sergeant 1929, sergeant 1931. Service in India 1922 -1931. China for 9 months in 1931. Posted to 7th Battalion 1934. Reposted 2nd battalion in January 1939. Promoted Colour Sergeant and appointed Company Quartermaster Sergeant a month later. 1940 saw service in..."
Click For More

"...are a few I remember:- Pontious Pilates Bodyguard (1st Foot) Royal Scots Fusiliers. Mutton-chop Lancers (2nd? Foot)The Queens Regt The Buffs. (3rd Foot) The nickname became the official name of the East Kent Regt. The Fighting Fifth (Northumberland Fusiliers. Shiny Ten (City of London Regt.Royal Fusiliers) Bloody Eleventh (Devons) Silly Welsh B------s (South Wales Borderers)24th?Foot Old Braggs Regt or The Kinnegad Slashers.(The Glosters) 28th Foot Pompadours (Essex Regt) 44 Foot..."
Click For More

"could anyone who served with the royal northumberland fusiliers between 1936/1946 and knew fusilier fred smith please contct me i am trying to find a photo and information of the dad i never knew  for my own research for my book + my own need to see what he looked like .thakyou coral mcnulty my e mail is coralmcnulty@aol.com. "
Click For More

"Forces Reunited has recently learned with regret of the death of Mr Wanless, formerly of the Green Howards and Northumberland Fusiliers, on Friday 12 May 2006.  Our sympathies are with his family at this sad time. Last edited by Site Admin"
Click For More

"Wilfred Wanless served with the Green Howards and Northumberland Fusiliers and was a member of Forces Reunited. His family asked us to post an announcement. "
Click For More

Down arrow Up arrow 529 people in our Victorian Conflicts records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 2387 people in our Boer War records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 26299 people in our WW1 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 1530 people in our WW2 records
Filter by Surname:
Down arrow Up arrow 105 people in our Post WW2 records
Filter by Surname:

Battles / Campaigns

Mons (1914) WW1

The Mons - one of the Frontier Battles
1st Northumberland fusiliers involved and serving with 9th Brigade,3rd Divsion, BEF (British Expeditionary Force)

British
• Sir John French
• 4 divisions (approx. 70,000 men)
Germans
• General Alexander von Kluck
• 8 divisions (approx. 150,000 men)


Mons - Conde canal (August 23) Involved the BEF Led by Sir John French, the BEF moved into position in front of Mons and formed a line along the Mons-Condé Canal, just to the left of the French Fifth Army. It was the first major action of the First World War, A fully professional force, the BEF dug in to await the advancing Germans who were sweeping through Belgium in accordance to the Schlieffen Plan. On August 22, after being defeated by the Germans, the commander of the Fifth Army, General Charles Lanrezac, asked French to hold his position along the canal for 24 hours while French fell back.
Agreeing, French instructed his two corps commanders, General Douglas Haig and General Horace Smith-Dorrien to prepare for the German onslaught.

At 5:30 AM on August 23, French again met with Haig and Smith-Dorrien and told them to strengthen the line along the canal and to prepare the canal bridges for demolition. In the early morning mist and rain, the Germans began appearing on the BEF's 20-mile front in increasing numbers. Shortly before 9:00 AM, German guns were in position north of the canal and opened fire on the BEF's positions. This was followed by an eight-battalion assault by the German infantry. Approaching the British lines Obourg and Nimy, this attack was met by heavy fire from the BEF's veteran infantry.
Decimating the German ranks, the British maintained such a high rate of fire with their Lee-Enfield rifles that the attackers believed they were facing machine guns. As Germans arrived in greater numbers, the attacks intensified forcing the British to consider falling back. On the north edge of Mons, a bitter fight started between the Germans and the 4th Royal Fusiliers (City of London) Regt’. A swing bridge was left open by the British and the Germans were able to cross. Private August Neiemeier jumped in the canal and managed to close it.

By noon, French was forced to order his men to start falling back due to heavy pressure on his front and the appearance of the Germans on his right flank. Around 2:00 PM, Mons was abandoned and elements of the BEF became engaged in rearguard actions along the line. As night fell, the Germans halted their assault to reform their lines. With the pressure relieved, the BEF fell back to Le Cateau and Landrecies.

The Battle of Mons cost the British around 1,600 killed and wounded. For the Germans, the capture of Mons proved costly as their losses numbered around 5,000 killed and wounded. Though a defeat, the stand of the BEF bought valuable time for Belgian and French forces to fall back in an attempt to form a new defensive line.

Marne (1914) WW1

The 1st Northumberland Fusiliers attached to 9th Infantry Brigade 3rd Division and was part of the British Expeditionary Force (John French, serving as the first Commander-in-Chief of the BEF)

The First Battle of the Marne: fought between 5 and 12 September 1914 marked the end of the German sweep into France and the beginning of the trench warfare that was to characterise World War One.
It was also one of the first major battles in which reconnaissance planes played a decisive role, by discovering weak points in the German lines and allowing the allies to take advantage of them.

Germany's grand Schlieffen Plan to conquer France entailed a wheeling movement of the northern wing of its armies through central Belgium to enter France near Lille. It would turn west near the English Channel and then south to cut off the French retreat. If the plan succeeded, Germany's armies would simultaneously encircle the French Army from the north and capture Paris.

A French offensive in Lorraine prompted German counter-attacks that threw the French back onto a fortified barrier. Their defence strengthened, they could send troops to reinforce their left flank - a redistribution of strength that would prove vital in the Battle of the Marne. The German northern wing was weakened further by the removal of 11 divisions to fight in Belgium and East Prussia. The German 1st Army, under Kluck, then swung north of Paris, rather than south west, as intended. This required them to pass into the valley of the River Marne across the Paris defences, exposing them to a flank attack and a possible counter-envelopment.

On 3 September, Joffre ordered a halt to the French retreat and three days later his reinforced left flank began a general offensive. Kluck was forced to halt his advance prematurely in order to support his flank: he was still no further up the Marne Valley than Meaux.

On 9 September Bülow learned that the British Expeditionary Force (BEF) was advancing into the gap between his 2nd Army and Kluck. He ordered a retreat, obliging Kluck to do the same. The counterattack of the French 5th and 6th Armies and the BEF developed into the First Battle of the Marne, a general counter-attack by the French Army. By 11 September the Germans were in full retreat.

This remarkable change in fortunes was caused partially by the exhaustion of many of the German forces: some had marched more than 240km (150 miles), fighting frequently. The German advance was also hampered by demolished bridges and railways, constricting their supply lines, and they had underestimated the resilience of the French.

The Germans withdrew northward from the Marne and made a firm defensive stand along the Lower Aisne River. Here the benefits of defence over attack became clear as the Germans repelled successive Allied attacks from the shelter of trenches: the First Battle of the Aisne marked the real beginning of trench warfare on the Western Front.

In saving Paris from capture by pushing the Germans back some 72km (45 miles), the First Battle of the Marne was a great strategic victory, as it enabled the French to continue the war. However, the Germans succeeded in capturing a large part of the industrial north east of France, a serious blow. Furthermore, the rest of 1914 bred the geographic and tactical deadlock that would take another three years and countless lives to break.

The Battle of Marne was also one of the first major battles in which reconnaissance planes played a decisive role, by discovering weak points in the German lines and allowing the allies to take advantage of them. The mobility and destructive power of the numerous French 75 batteries engaged in the Battle of the Marne played a key role in slowing down and then halting German progress everywhere.

Over two million men fought in the First Battle of the Marne, of whom more than 500,000 were killed or wounded. French casualties totalled 250,000, 80,000 of them dead, while British casualties were 13,000, 1,700 of them dead. The Germans suffered 220,000 casualties.

Vittorio Veneto (1918) WW1

The battle of Vittoria Veneto was fought between the Austro-Hungarian Empire and an alliance of Britain, France, Italy and United States between October and November 1918. It took place at Vittorio Veneto, Italy. The Austro-Hungarian Army was on the offensive following the recent Italian defeat at the battle of Caporetta in late 1917. The Italians held strong along the Piave defensive line, defeating the Austro-Hungarians. The Italians waited until they were ready and launched across the river Piave aiming to capture Vittoria and cut communications. Within seven days not only had this target been achieved but Czechoslovakia, the South Slavs and Hungary had all declared independence resulting in a general retreat of the Austro-Hungarian army. The allies pressed on and not only did this decisive allied victory bring about the end of the war on the Italian front, it also signalled the end of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. A mere 5,800 allied soldiers (374 were British) lost their lives compared to the 35,000 dead, 100,000 wounded and 300,000 captured on the other side
1

Active From: 1782 - 1968

One moment...

Please wait while we connect with Facebook

Loading